Colorado

  • June 18, 2024

    Embattled Colo. DA Defends Handling Of Murder Case

    An elected Colorado prosecutor facing disciplinary charges related to her handling of a high profile murder case testified before a disciplinary panel on Tuesday, insisting in sometimes combative testimony that she never made inappropriate public comments about the case.

  • June 18, 2024

    Meat Plant Workers Seek OK On Latest $4M Wage-Fix Deal

    Red meat processing plant workers have sought preliminary approval for their latest settlement over wage-fixing claims, a $4 million deal that adds American Foods Group LLC to the list of companies to cut deals that also includes JBS, Tyson, Perdue, Seaboard, Triumph and consulting firm Webber Meng Sahl & Co.

  • June 18, 2024

    Colo. Justices Iffy On Cake's Message In Baker's Speech Suit

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Tuesday pressed a Christian cake baker on whether requiring him to make a pink cake with blue frosting to celebrate a customer's gender transition counts as "compelled speech" under a recent high court ruling, with some justices skeptical that such a cake has inherent meaning.

  • June 18, 2024

    Green Group Insists It Can Fight Colo. Air Plan Approval

    The Center for Biological Diversity told the Tenth Circuit it didn't forfeit its challenge to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's approval of a Colorado air emissions permitting program and that the agency is wrong to assert otherwise.

  • June 18, 2024

    Frontier Airlines Passholder Suit To Be Arbitrated

    Frontier Airlines Inc. has successfully pushed out of court a proposed class action claiming its "All You Can Fly" passes are "relatively unusable," after a Colorado federal judge ruled that there is nothing "substantively unfair" about the arbitration clause to which the would-be passengers agreed.

  • June 18, 2024

    Nuggets Accused Of Racial Profiling Over Front-Row Seat

    A fan who says that employees of the Denver Nuggets racially profiled him at a game in December, in a confrontation he recorded and posted on social media, is suing the NBA franchise, its arena and owner Stan Kroenke for discrimination.

  • June 18, 2024

    10th Circ. Won't Revive Airline's Union Election Challenge

    A low-cost airline based in the Salt Lake City area lost its challenge to a union representation as the Tenth Circuit ruled that a Utah federal judge correctly dismissed the case.

  • June 18, 2024

    Wilson Elser Hires 2 McElroy Deutsch Partners In Denver

    Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker LLP has hired four attorneys from McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP, including two insurance coverage and defense litigation partners, for its Denver office.

  • June 17, 2024

    Trader Claims Firm Owes Bonus On $37M Texas Storm Profits

    A trader told a Denver jury Monday that a Colorado energy marketing company fired him as retaliation after he accused the CEO of failing to pay out his cut of $37 million from trades made during a 2021 Texas storm that caused natural gas prices to spike.

  • June 17, 2024

    Email Doesn't Cut It For Contempt Notice, Colo. Justices Say

    Colorado justices on Monday ruled that email is not enough to properly put a party on notice about contempt proceedings, concluding the medium does not meet the requirement for "directly" serving a party.

  • June 17, 2024

    Feds, Tribes Say It's Too Soon To Reopen Monument Suit

    The federal government, tribes and conservation groups are fighting a bid by Utah and farming associations to lift a more than three-year stay in a challenge to the Bears Ears National Monument, arguing that the state is already involved in litigation that attempts to nullify the presidential proclamation that established it.

  • June 17, 2024

    Colo. Justices To Review Prefiling Interest Cap Dispute

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Monday agreed to review whether a state court can let prefiling interest exceed the state's $1 million economic damages cap under the Health Care Availability Act, in a suit over a man's injuries at birth.

  • June 17, 2024

    Pharmacy Groups Urge High Court To Hear Okla. PBM Case

    Pharmacy industry groups asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse a Tenth Circuit decision that overturned portions of an Oklahoma law regulating pharmacy benefit managers, saying these intermediaries have driven up costs for patients while raising their own bottom lines, and states should be allowed to keep them in check.

  • June 14, 2024

    Real Estate Recap: Special Servicers, 'Dirty' Money, Alt Energy

    Catch up on this week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including recent litigation targeting special servicers, a 700% increase in brownfield funding, and one BigLaw real estate leader's take on alternative energy as interest rates hold steady.

  • June 14, 2024

    Blistering Dissents Belie Justices' Penchant For Consensus

    Thirteen days into June, the U.S. Supreme Court had recorded one of the highest rates of unanimous decisions in the past four decades. But the era of historic consensus was tarnished a bit Friday when the court issued three split decisions and two scathing dissents highlighting how much the nine justices differ.

  • June 14, 2024

    Janssen Hit With $150M Verdict In HIV Drug False Claims Suit

    A New Jersey federal jury hit Janssen with a $150 million False Claims Act verdict in a 12-year-old whistleblower suit, finding that the drugmaker violated the federal law as well as 27 related state FCA statutes by illegally profiting from the off-label marketing of two popular Janssen HIV medications.

  • June 14, 2024

    Colo. Says Pollution Law Leaves Details Up In The Air

    Colorado's Air Quality Control Commission said state lawmakers gave it a long leash to implement a 2021 law requiring more stringent air pollution monitoring in disproportionately impacted communities, urging a state judge to reject environmental groups' challenge to a permitting rule. 

  • June 14, 2024

    Judge Won't Undo Save Of J&J Patent After Fed. Circ. Ruling

    A federal court has refused to reconsider a March decision finding Tolmar failed to show a patent on Janssen's blockbuster schizophrenia drug Invega Sustenna was invalid as obvious.

  • June 14, 2024

    Colo. Town Says It Took Resort Co.'s Land To Protect Sheep

    A Colorado town has told a state appeals court it was justified in condemning and taking over local land that was owned by The Vail Corp. because the town needed to preserve wildlife space for a bighorn sheep herd.

  • June 13, 2024

    Ex-Colo. DA Rips Current Prosecutor Over Conduct In Murder Case

    A prominent former Colorado district attorney on Thursday roundly criticized a sitting prosecutor accused of misconduct, noting her freewheeling commentary about ongoing cases led to dismissals and suggested she refused to acknowledge the team she led had been "a bunch of disorganized, sloppy lawyers." 

  • June 13, 2024

    Colo. News Station Must Face Claim Over Contractor Shooting

    A Denver news station must face a man's vicarious liability claim over the actions of a plainclothes security guard who shot and killed a man during a police protest while working for the TV station, the Colorado Court of Appeals said Thursday.

  • June 13, 2024

    Telecom Says Gov't Switching Sides In Dish Suit Is 'Bad Faith'

    Vermont National Telephone Co. is fighting to preserve its false claim suit against Dish Network and others in the face of a dismissal bid from the federal government, arguing in a newly public filing in D.C. federal court that the government has provided no good reason for its "bad faith" change of heart.

  • June 13, 2024

    Colo. Judge's Voir Dire Tip: Jurors Dislike Judgmental Attys

    The District of Colorado's chief judge urged attorneys to tread carefully while playing jurors off one another during voir dire, telling lawyers at a presentation Thursday that referencing another juror's response can come off as judgmental.

  • June 13, 2024

    Cyclist's Widow Can Seek Punitive Award From Crashing Atty

    A Colorado federal judge is allowing a bicyclist's widow to revise her lawsuit against the attorney whose car fatally crashed into her husband as he rode, granting a bid to include punitive damages under state law.

  • June 13, 2024

    Data Center Developer Secures Upsized $9.2B Investment

    Hyperscale data center campus company Vantage Data Centers said it has secured a $9.2 billion equity investment from DigitalBridge Group Inc. and Silver Lake, which is nearly $3 billion more than anticipated when the investment was first announced back in January.

Expert Analysis

  • What Nevada 'Superbasin' Ruling Means For Water Users

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    The Nevada Supreme Court's recent decision in Sullivan v. Lincoln County Water District, affirming that the state can manage multiple predesignated water basins as one "superbasin," significantly broadens the scope of water constraints that project developers in Nevada and throughout the West may need to consider, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • What Rescheduling Could Mean For Cannabis Bankruptcies

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    Bankruptcy courts have historically been closed for cannabis-related businesses, but recent case law coupled with a possible reclassification of cannabis provides cautious optimism, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • What New Waste Management Laws Signal For The Future

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    Several states have enacted extended producer responsibility and recycling labeling laws that will take effect in the next few years and force manufacturers to take responsibility for the end of life of their products, so companies should closely follow compliance timelines and push to innovate in the area, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • Opinion

    Justices' Trump Ballot Ruling May Spark Constitutional Crisis

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling that former President Donald Trump must be reinstated to Colorado’s primary ballot endorses an unnecessarily broad legal theory of disqualification from federal office, raising constitutional questions that will only become more urgent as the next presidential election nears, says Devon Ombres at the Center for American Progress.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Enforcement Risk Amid Increased Consumer Data Use

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    While no state has introduced a private right of action for noncompliance with a comprehensive consumer privacy law — except for the California Consumer Privacy Act's data breach provision — organizations and retailers face risk from enforcement actions by state attorneys general and privacy regulators, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • Litigation Inspiration: A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

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    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • Series

    Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

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