Connecticut

  • June 25, 2024

    Conn. Justices Limit Malpractice Claims In Criminal Cases

    Convicts who want to sue their attorneys for malpractice in their criminal cases must first have their convictions vacated on appeal or in habeas proceedings, with one exception, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled Tuesday in a case brought against a New Haven lawyer and his law firm.

  • June 25, 2024

    Law Firm Boss Admitted Breaking Ethics Rule, Regulator Says

    Connecticut attorney discipline authorities told a state court Monday that the managing partner of a Hartford-based personal injury and employment law firm cannot walk back an admission to a rule violation, reaffirming earlier calls to suspend Emanuele R. Cicchiello for threatening a criminal probe and downloading a departing junior attorney's personal emails.

  • June 25, 2024

    2nd Circ. Affirms 5-Year Sentence For Impostor Immigration Atty

    A Connecticut woman sentenced to five years in federal prison for stealing money from vulnerable victims by pretending to be an immigration attorney can't undo her plea deal or lessen the roughly $368,000 she was ordered to pay in restitution, the Second Circuit has ruled.

  • June 25, 2024

    Conn. Atty Agrees To 10-Day Suspension For Unexplained Fee

    A Connecticut attorney accused of charging an unreasonable fee and failing to communicate with a former client following an underlying vehicle buyback negotiation has agreed to a 10-day suspension and three hours of legal ethics-focused continuing education courses.

  • June 24, 2024

    Judge Mulls BioXcel's Duty To Tell Investors Of FDA Troubles

    A Connecticut federal judge wondered Monday if executives at the artificial intelligence-driven drugmaker BioXcel Therapeutics Inc. had an opportunity to correct problems that government regulators identified with a key clinical trial and, if so, whether their statements on the subject to investors could be considered false or misleading.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices End Irish Landowner's Fight Against $23M Clawback

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a challenge by Irish businessman Sean Dunne and his ex-wife Gayle Killilea to a Chapter 7 trustee's roughly $23 million avoidance action win, leaving intact a Connecticut jury verdict and a Second Circuit rejection of the onetime couple's claims.

  • June 24, 2024

    Architect Wants Roofer's Claim Nixed Over $17.6M School Fires

    Connecticut architectural firm Silver Petrucelli & Associates Inc. asked a state judge on Monday to strike a cross-claim by a builder it accused of impermissably using blowtorches to attach flashing to a school roof, setting fires in December 2021 and July 2022 that caused an alleged $17.6 million in damage.

  • June 24, 2024

    Illinois, Other States Back FTC Bid To Affirm Intuit Ad Ruling

    Illinois, along with 20 other states and the District of Columbia, defended the Federal Trade Commission in tax software giant Intuit's Fifth Circuit constitutional challenge to the agency's findings that the company engaged in deceptive advertising, saying in an amicus brief that the FTC's conclusion was correct.

  • June 24, 2024

    Cannabis Biz Greenrose Files $6.5M Ch. 7 In New York

    The Greenrose Holding Co. Inc., a cultivator and distributor of cannabis products, filed for Chapter 7 in a New York bankruptcy court, claiming over $6.5 million in liabilities it seeks to address through liquidation.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices Pass On Conn. School Vaccine Mandate Fight

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a Second Circuit decision that largely upheld the dismissal of a suit challenging a Connecticut law passed during the COVID-19 pandemic that revoked religious exemptions to student vaccine mandates.

  • June 24, 2024

    2nd Circ. Reopens Insider Trading Suit Against Hedge Fund

    The Second Circuit on Monday revived a lawsuit accusing hedge fund Raging Capital Management LLC of profiting off its position as a corporate insider of 1-800-Flowers, rejecting arguments that a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling overturned circuit precedent allowing shareholders to sue beneficial owners who partake in short-swing trading.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices Send 3 US Trustee Fee Cases Back To Lower Courts

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday vacated three appellate court decisions ordering refunds to debtors who had overpaid U.S. Trustee's Office fees under a previous fee structure and remanded the cases for further adjudication after resolving the issue earlier this month.

  • June 21, 2024

    Real Estate Recap: Distressed Deals, Housing Hurdles, Infill

    Catch up on this week's key state developments from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including tips for guiding distressed office deals, the latest intel from Harvard University's Joint Center for Housing Studies, and how one U.S. city has been a magnet for federal funding of brownfield projects.

  • June 21, 2024

    Lockheed Units To Pay $70M To End FCA Cost Inflation Suit

    Sikorsky Support Services Inc. and Derco Aerospace Inc. have agreed to pay $70 million to settle a federal lawsuit alleging that they overcharged the U.S. Navy for spare parts and materials for training aircraft through an illegal subcontracting arrangement, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Friday.

  • June 21, 2024

    Conn. Steel Co. Files Ch. 11 After Contractor Dispute

    A $2.29 million judgment and the sunsetting of the $7.5 million limit for a bankruptcy provision aimed at small businesses prompted a Connecticut steel company to hit Chapter 11 this week, an attorney for the debtor said at a hearing Friday.

  • June 21, 2024

    Former CEO Wins Unpaid Benefits Suit Against Credit Union

    A Connecticut federal judge granted a win to a former CEO claiming a credit union refused to fully pay out his retirement benefits after he was abruptly fired over his Parkinson's disease diagnosis, saying he put forward enough detail to connect his termination with his disability.

  • June 21, 2024

    9/11 Firm Consultant Acted Alone In Depo Leak, 2nd Circ. Told

    A New York law firm representing victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks in a multidistrict litigation told the Second Circuit that a consultant who leaked a deposition transcript to the press acted by himself, asking an appellate panel to reverse millions of dollars in sanctions.

  • June 20, 2024

    Conn. Atty Can't Get Reinstated Early After Embezzlement Rap

    A Connecticut state court judge dismissed the reinstatement application of a disbarred attorney who, according to disciplinary authorities, filed it nearly 13 years early and without paying full restitution for the embezzlement that sent him to prison.

  • June 20, 2024

    HHS Drug Pricing Program Flouts Constitution, Boehringer Says

    An "unprecedented" new Medicare price negotiation program deprives drugmakers of their constitutional rights and forces them to make declarations on issues of public concern that reflect poorly on them, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc. argued Thursday in Connecticut federal court as it echoed the industry chorus seeking to strike the initiative.

  • June 20, 2024

    11th Circ. Backs Stryker's Defeat Of Fired Worker's Leave Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit refused Thursday to revive a suit claiming medical technology company Stryker illegally fired a worker on leave awaiting the birth of his child, ruling that because the leave didn't formally kick in until the child was born, his termination was fair game.

  • June 20, 2024

    Conn. Firm Says Thomson Reuters Unit Bungled Web Overhaul

    A Thomson Reuters unit botched a portion of a $2,336-per-month contract to overhaul a Middlebury, Connecticut, law firm's website, blend its online presence into FindLaw and include its attorneys in "Super Lawyers" listings, the firm says in a state court lawsuit made public on Thursday.

  • June 20, 2024

    2nd Circ. Affirms AIG's Win In Ex-Atty's Retaliation Suit

    A former legal executive's retaliation lawsuit against American International Group Inc. has fizzled out as the Second Circuit on Thursday upheld an earlier ruling that found he was not fired for blowing the whistle on alleged fraud.

  • June 20, 2024

    19 Dem AGs Urge Law Group, Others To Ignore DEI Detractors

    A coalition of 19 Democratic state attorneys general issued a letter Thursday rebutting criticism of diversity, equity and inclusion programs within the American Bar Association, Fortune 100 corporations and law firms.

  • June 18, 2024

    High Court Petition Asks Justices: What's A 'Willful' Kickback?

    Does a "willful" act under federal anti-kickback law require a defendant to know that the conduct violates the law? That's the question a whistleblower is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to answer in order to resolve what the petition calls a circuit split on a key question of federal fraud prosecutions.

  • June 18, 2024

    Group Home's Atty In Europe On Day Of Depos, Court Told

    The Connecticut Institute for the Blind should be sanctioned because its attorney went to Europe and three witnesses, including the CEO, failed to appear for depositions after a $13.4 million verdict arising from the death of a group home resident, the man's family told a state court judge Tuesday.

Expert Analysis

  • What Bankruptcy Deadline Appeal May Mean For Claimants

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    If the Third Circuit reverses a recent appeal made in In re: Promise Healthcare, litigation claimants within the circuit will not be able to rely on the proof of claim process to preserve the claim — but if the court affirms, the U.S. Supreme Court may need to step in to resolve the circuit split on this issue, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Conn. Bankruptcy Ruling Furthers Limitation Extension Split

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    A recent Connecticut bankruptcy court decision further solidifies a split of authority on whether Bankruptcy Rule 9006(b) may be used to extend the limitations period, meaning practitioners seeking to extend should serve the motion on all applicable parties and, where possible, rely on the doctrine of equitable tolling, says Shane Ramsey at Nelson Mullins.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • 2nd Circ. Adviser Liability Ruling May Shape SEC Enforcement

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission v. Rashid, applying basic negligence principles to reverse a finding of investment adviser liability, provides a road map for future fraud enforcement proceedings, says Elisha Kobre at Bradley Arant.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • What To Know About State-Level Health Data Privacy Laws

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    Companies that handle consumer health data, including those in the retail sector, should take a conservative approach when interpreting the scope of new health privacy laws in Washington, Nevada and Connecticut, which may include development of privacy notices, consent procedures, rights request response processes and processor contracts, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Opinion

    Expanded Detention Will Not Solve Immigration Challenges

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    The recently defeated bipartisan border package included provisions that would increase funding for detention, a costly distraction from reforms like improved adjudication and legal representation that could address legitimate economic and public safety concerns at much lower cost, say Alexandra Dufresne and Kyle Wolf at Cornell University.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • 2nd Circ. Baby Food Ruling Disregards FDA's Expertise

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    The Second Circuit's recent decision in White v. Beech-Nut Nutrition, refusing to defer litigation over heavy metals in baby food until the U.S. Food and Drug Administration weighs in on the issue, provides no indication that courts will resolve the issue with greater efficiency than the FDA, say attorneys at Phillips Lytle.

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