Corporate Crime & Compliance UK

  • June 12, 2024

    Eurojust Dismantles €113M Fraudulent Investment Scheme

    Police have taken down a €113 million ($122.2 million) pyramid fraud scheme based around crypto mining in an operation spanning several European countries, the Eurojust European law enforcement agency said on Wednesday.

  • June 12, 2024

    BHS Ruling A 'Coup For Liquidators' Over Director Duties

    A landmark ruling that found two directors liable for the collapse of a U.K. retailer and ordered them to repay a chunk of the losses highlights the limited reliance that directors can place on professional advice and a lack of experience to avoid responsibility.

  • June 12, 2024

    Investors To Sue Betting Giant For £100M Over Bribery Probe

    Entain PLC, the owner of gambling businesses Ladbrokes and Coral, is set to face a £100 million ($128 million) legal battle from institutional investors who say Entain did not warn them about a prosecution over its alleged failure to prevent bribery in Turkey.

  • June 12, 2024

    Automakers Safe From French Law In 'Dieselgate' Disclosure

    Vehicle manufacturers including Renault and Peugeot Citroen that face thousands of "dieselgate" claims for allegedly cheating car emission tests are not at any risk of criminal prosecution in France while disclosing evidence before trial in England, a London court has ruled.

  • June 12, 2024

    Fuel Trader Says £5M Payments Were For Market Advice

    A former fuel trader insisted at his fraud trial in London on Wednesday that he received £5.2 million ($6.6 million) in payments for providing consultancy advice on "betting on the right horse" rather than in secret commissions.

  • June 11, 2024

    PC Gaming Giant Valve Faces £656M Action For Overcharging

    Valve Corp., owner of the world's largest video game distribution platform, Steam, has been hit with a proposed £656 million ($836 million) class action for allegedly overcharging 14 million PC gamers in the U.K., the digital rights campaigner filing the claim announced Wednesday.

  • June 11, 2024

    UniCredit Overturns $69M Plane Payment Sanctions Ruling

    UniCredit was entitled to withhold $69.3 million in payments to lessors for Russian planes because of sanctions, a London appellate court ruled Tuesday, partly overturning findings that it was not reasonable for the bank's U.K. branch to believe it could not make the payments. 

  • June 11, 2024

    KC Advised Post Office To Remove Judge From Horizon Trial

    A top barrister advised the Post Office to get a High Court judge to recuse himself from a trial dealing with wrongly prosecuted subpostmasters or else risk losing all litigation brought by the subpostmasters, the barrister recalled in an inquiry hearing Tuesday regarding the scandal.

  • June 11, 2024

    Tories Pledge To Tackle Court Backlog, Carry On Rwanda Plan

    The Conservative Party announced a slew of justice plans on Tuesday to cut the criminal court backlog, support third-party litigation funding and abandon international human rights commitments, if necessary, to pursue its Rwanda migrants policy.

  • June 11, 2024

    Serco Denies Directors Knew Of Fraud In Securities Trial

    Serco Group PLC denied investors are entitled to compensation over a fraud that caused the outsourcing giant's share price to nosedive, arguing on the second day of a London trial Tuesday that none of its directors had known about the alleged wrongdoing.

  • June 11, 2024

    Widow Who Signed Docs 'Without Reading' Still Owes $64M

    A London appellate court has ruled that a former Hong Kong resident can't escape a personal guarantee to pay 500 million Hong Kong dollars ($64 million) to cover bonds issued by her husband's company, in part because she entered the contract for business purposes.

  • June 11, 2024

    FCA Eyes Consumer Impact Of New Legal Cooperation Rules

    The Financial Conduct Authority has set out how it is working with the Financial Ombudsman Service and other bodies under a new duty of legal cooperation required by the Consumer Duty and changing payments regulations.

  • June 11, 2024

    LC&F Administrators Attack Ex-Boss' Credibility In Ponzi Case

    The administrators of London Capital & Finance PLC have criticized the company's former head as a "thoroughly unreliable witness" as they closed their case that he and others operated the business as a £237 million ($302 million) Ponzi scheme.

  • June 11, 2024

    BHS Directors To Pay Liquidators £18M For Wrongful Trading

    A London judge ordered two former directors of failed retail chain BHS on Tuesday to pay liquidators at least £18 million ($23 million) after finding that they knew that the company was beyond rescue when it was purchased in 2015.

  • June 10, 2024

    23andMe Faces UK-Canadian Probe Into Data Breach

    The U.K. and Canada said Monday that they are jointly investigating a data breach at genetic testing company 23andMe, which allowed hackers to access data from 6.9 million users.

  • June 10, 2024

    Man Gets 1 Year For Manslaughter Of Ex-Boss In 2006 Attack

    An Albanian man was sentenced to a year in prison Monday for killing his former boss, after the Crown Prosecution Service linked the victim's life-altering head injuries from an attack nearly two decades ago to his death in 2017.

  • June 10, 2024

    Starmer Could Crack Judicial Crisis, Former CPS Chiefs Say

    Keir Starmer's lead in the polls as the general election in July approaches has sparked hopes among criminal justice advocates that the Labour leader — a former top prosecutor — will implement reforms as prime minister.

  • June 10, 2024

    Serco Accused Of Playing Around With Books As Trial Opens

    Institutional investors told a London court Monday that Serco had "played around" with its financial reporting to keeping the government from clocking fraud in its contract for electronic tagging services as a landmark securities trial kicked off.

  • June 10, 2024

    European Financial Body Calls On UK To Clarify AML Reforms

    A European body representing financial market participants has called on HM Treasury to provide more clarity in the Money Laundering Regulations through planned amendments, including by specifying the exact point when a firm must check a potential customer's background.

  • June 10, 2024

    Amazon Sold Facial Tech To Russia, Ex-Employee Alleges

    A former Amazon worker has alleged that the technology giant sold facial recognition software to a Russian company in violation of U.K. sanctions.

  • June 07, 2024

    Feds Charge UK Trio Over $2M 'Evolved Apes' NFT Scheme

    Three United Kingdom residents face criminal wire fraud and money laundering charges brought by federal prosecutors in Manhattan alleging they misappropriated cryptocurrency worth roughly $2 million as part of a "rug pull scheme" involving the digital assets known as non-fungible tokens.

  • June 07, 2024

    Merchants Get OK For Visa, Mastercard Fees Suit On 2nd Try

    A group of merchants got a tentative go-ahead Friday to bring a collective action accusing Visa and Mastercard of unfairly imposing interchange fees on retailers after revising weaknesses in the initial proposal at the U.K.'s specialist antitrust court.

  • June 07, 2024

    Crypto Developers Fight To Gag Wright After 'Satoshi' Trial

    A group of cryptocurrency asset developers urged a London judge on Friday to order Australian computer scientist Craig Wright to never again assert that he is the pseudonymous inventor of bitcoin Satoshi Nakamoto, arguing it was the best way to end his "campaign of dishonesty."

  • June 07, 2024

    Axed Telecom CEO Loses Early Battle In Whistleblower Suit

    A former interim chief executive officer at a telecom company has failed for now to get her job back, with a tribunal saying it was unconvinced by her early-stage claim that she was unfairly dismissed for calling out allegedly unlawful business proposals that would breach agreements with HSBC.

  • June 07, 2024

    Former Allianz Unit Exec Admits Role In $6B Fund Fraud

    A former portfolio manager at Allianz SE's U.S. unit told a Manhattan federal judge Friday that he lied to investors about the risks of the German finance giant's now-defunct Structured Alpha Funds, admitting to his role in a $6 billion fraud.

Expert Analysis

  • BT Case May Shape UK Class Action Landscape

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    The first opt-out collective action trial commenced in Le Patourel v. BT in the U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal last month, regarding BT's abuse of dominance by overcharging millions of customers, will likely provide clarification on damages and funder returns in collective actions, which could significantly affect the class action regime, say lawyers at RPC.

  • No-Poach Agreements Face Greater EU Antitrust Scrutiny

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    EU competition authorities are increasingly viewing employer no-poach agreements as anti-competitive and an enforcement priority, demonstrating that such provisions are no longer without risk in Europe, and proving the importance of understanding EU antitrust law concerns and implications, says Robert Hardy at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Key Points From EC Economic Security Screening Initiatives

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    Lawyers at Herbert Smith analyze the European Commission's five recently announced initiatives aimed at de-risking the EU's trade and investment links with third countries, including the implementation of mandatory screening mechanisms and extending coverage to investments made by EU companies that are controlled subsidiaries of non-EU investors.

  • Following The Road Map Toward Quantum Security

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    With the Financial Conduct Authority’s recent publication of a white paper on a quantum-secure financial sector, firms should begin to consider the quantum transition early — before the process is driven by regulatory obligations — with the goal of developing a cybersecurity architecture that is agile while also allowing for quantum security, say lawyers at Cleary.

  • Why EU Ruling On Beneficial Ownership May Affect The UK

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    Following the EU judgment in Sovim v. Luxembourg that public access to beneficial ownership information conflicts with data protection rights, several British overseas territories and dependencies have recently reversed their commitment to introduce unrestricted access, and challenges to the U.K.’s liberal stance may be on the cards, says Rupert Cullen at Allectus Law.

  • UK Gov't Response Clarifies AI Regulation Approach

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    Although the U.K. government’s recent response to its artificial intelligence consultation is a clear signal of its continuing pro-innovation approach to AI regulation, high-level systems are likely to be the focus of scrutiny and organizations may consider reviewing measures they have implemented to help identify risks, say Christopher Foo and Edward Machin at Ropes & Gray.

  • Key Changes In FRC Code Aim To Promote Good Governance

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    The focus of the recently published Financial Reporting Council Corporate Governance Code on risk management and internal controls is to ensure the competitiveness of the U.K. listing regime while not compromising on governance standards, and issuers may wish to consider updating their policies in order to follow best practice, say lawyers at Debevoise.

  • Ruling In FCA Case Offers Tips On Flexible Work Requests

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    In Wilson v. Financial Conduct Authority, the Employment Tribunal recently found that the regulator's rejection of a remote work request was justified, highlighting for employers factors that affect flexible work request outcomes, while emphasizing that individual inquiries should be considered on the specific facts, say Frances Rollin, Ella Tunnell and Kerry Garcia at Stevens & Bolton.

  • EU Vote Delay Puts Course Of Sustainability Directive In Doubt

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    With time to adopt the proposed EU Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive during this Parliamentary term running out, and with upcoming elections threatening political uncertainty, the degree of compromise that may be needed to secure a "yes" vote now could undermine the shift the legislation seeks to achieve, say lawyers at Simpson Thacher.

  • Full EU Import Border Controls Pose Hurdles For UK Cos.

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    The U.K.’s long-anticipated introduction of full border controls on imports of goods from the EU, due to complete by the end of 2024, brings the system broadly into line with goods imported from the rest of the world, but may result in delays, increased costs and disruption as businesses adapt, say Ben Chivers and Jonathan Rush at Travers Smith.

  • Cos. Should Review Cookie Compliance After ICO Warnings

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    The Information Commissioner's Office recently restated its intention to take enforcement action on the unlawful use of nonessential cookies, and with the additional threat of public exposure and reputational damage, organizations should review their policies and banners to ensure they comply with data protection legislation, says Murron Marr at Shepherd & Wedderburn.

  • New Fraud Prevention Offense May Not Make Much Difference

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    By targeting only large organizations, the Economic Crime Act's new failure to prevent fraud offense is striking in that, despite its breadth, it will affect so few companies, and is therefore unlikely to help ordinary victims, says Andrew Smith at Corker Binning.

  • Mitigating And Managing Risks Of AI Use In Private Equity

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    While generative artificial intelligence has the ability to transform private equity firms and their portfolio companies, its deployment brings inherent risks, including those presented by the forthcoming EU AI Act, requiring appropriate risk management strategies, processes and policies to be adopted, says Barry Fishley at Weil.

  • Vodafone Decision Highlights Wide Scope Of UK's FDI Rules

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    The U.K. government’s recently imposed conditions required for its approval of Vodafone and Etisalat’s strategic relationship agreement under its National Security and Investment Act jurisdiction, illustrating the significance of the act as an important factor for transactions with a U.K. link, says Matthew Hall at McGuireWoods.

  • Decoding UK Case Law On Anti-Suit Injunctions

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    The English High Court's forthcoming decision on an anti-suit injunction filed in Augusta Energy v. Top Oil last month will provide useful guidance on application grounds for practitioners, but, pending that ruling, other recent decisions offer key considerations when making or resisting claims when there is an exclusive jurisdiction clause in the contract, says Abigail Healey at Quillon Law.

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