Discrimination

  • July 11, 2024

    Hospital Urges 4th Circ. To Back Win In Worker's Vax Bias Suit

    A Virginia health system told the Fourth Circuit to let its win stand in a former nurse's lawsuit claiming she was unlawfully fired for refusing the COVID-19 vaccine because of her Christian beliefs, saying the nurse raised only her personal misgivings, not religion, in her exemption request. 

  • July 11, 2024

    Navy Can't Get Out Of Ex-Marine's PTSD Discrimination Suit

    A Washington federal judge won't let the U.S. Navy out of a suit from a former Marine alleging that he was discriminated against and terminated over his post-traumatic stress disorder, saying there is enough evidence that a fact-finder could determine his boss retaliated against him.

  • July 11, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs Abbott's Trial Win In Black Worker's Bias Suit

    The Seventh Circuit refused to upend a jury verdict in favor of Abbott Laboratories and a manager in a Black former financial analyst's lawsuit, saying he failed to show that discrimination was afoot when he was stripped of several job duties and fired while out on leave.

  • July 11, 2024

    Regeneron Accused Of Firing Director Over Leave Requests

    Regeneron Pharmaceuticals fired a director four days after she requested a flexible work schedule to care for her disabled daughter and following her complaints that her boss verbally abused her for taking protected leave, according to a suit filed Thursday in New York federal court. 

  • July 11, 2024

    Atty Fined For Missing 'Every Deadline' Since Feb. In Bias Suit

    A Philadelphia-based attorney has missed so many deadlines in a federal race bias lawsuit against a Penn State University branch campus that the senior circuit judge assigned to his case issued sanctions and a stern warning that a large caseload is no excuse on Thursday.

  • July 11, 2024

    Atty's Trial Antics Don't Doom $3.4M Bias Verdict, Judge Says

    A trucking company won't get a chance to retry a race discrimination lawsuit that ended in a $3.4 million verdict against it last year after a Georgia federal judge found Wednesday that the plaintiff's counsel's improper conduct at trial didn't prejudice the jury.

  • July 10, 2024

    ​GOP Bombards Agencies With Demands After Chevron's End

    Republican leaders of major congressional committees Wednesday demanded details from dozens of agencies on policies suddenly shrouded in uncertainty after U.S. Supreme Court conservatives overturned the so-called Chevron doctrine, which for 40 years gave regulators flexibility in rulemaking and advantages in related litigation.

  • July 10, 2024

    Atty Says Alaska Judge Reprimand Bolsters 4th Circ. Bias Suit

    A former public defender awaiting a bench ruling on her sexual harassment claims against the federal judiciary said Wednesday that the judge deciding her case should note a recent ruling reprimanding an Alaska federal judge for his "sexualized relationship" with a clerk in which the Ninth Circuit Judicial Council determined that intent was irrelevant.

  • July 10, 2024

    UMB Fired VP After Denying Further Cancer Leave, Suit Says

    UMB Financial Corp. fired an executive for requesting more time to recover from chemotherapy treatments, according to a suit filed in Colorado federal court, after she was made to work 12-hour days in preparation for her leave to complete the work she would miss while she was out.

  • July 10, 2024

    EEOC Vice Chair Says Muldrow Won't Impede Diversity Work

    U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Vice Chair Jocelyn Samuels said Wednesday that the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in Muldrow v. St. Louis should not hinder companies' diversity and inclusion efforts, despite fears the justices' decision opens these initiatives up to more legal attacks.

  • July 10, 2024

    4 State AI Bills To Watch In 2nd Half Of 2024

    After Colorado recently moved to the forefront of regulating artificial intelligence in the workplace, numerous other states across the ideological spectrum — including conservative bastions like Oklahoma — are considering legislation of their own. Here, Law360 looks at four bills to regulate the use of AI in the workplace that bear watching in the second half of 2024. 

  • July 10, 2024

    7th Circ. Won't Renew Honeywell DEI Video White Bias Suit

    The Seventh Circuit refused Wednesday to revive a former Honeywell engineer's claims he was unlawfully fired after he declined to watch a diversity, equity and inclusion training film that he claimed vilified white people, ruling he was only making assumptions since he never watched the video.

  • July 10, 2024

    Salt Co. CEO, Worker Settle Suit Over Spurned Affair

    A Seattle-area gourmet sea salt company has settled a discrimination suit by an employee who says she was demoted and ostracized when she rejected sexual advances from its founder and CEO, who allegedly tried to win her over by paying for a new car, a new apartment and her student loans.

  • July 10, 2024

    X Corp., Musk Dodge $500M Severance Suit

    X Corp. and Elon Musk can escape claims they owe former employees $500 million in severance following the business mogul's purchase of the social platform formerly known as Twitter, a California federal judge ruled, saying the facts don't show that federal benefits law governed the payments workers received.

  • July 10, 2024

    Former Conn. Top Public Defender Claims Bias Led To Ouster

    The former chief public defender in Connecticut has filed a second action challenging her June 4 ouster for misconduct, lodging an administrative appeal in state court that claims racial bias.

  • July 10, 2024

    House Panel Votes To Nix Biden's Retirement Advice Rule

    A Republican-controlled panel of U.S. House lawmakers advanced legislation Wednesday to block recently finalized regulations from the U.S. Department of Labor that expand the definition of a fiduciary under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, after a brief debate on retirement policy that clearly split along party lines.

  • July 10, 2024

    Bankruptcy Filing Halts Dueling Unions' Defamation Dispute

    One of two security and law enforcement unions embroiled in defamation suits in Michigan federal court has informed the court that it has filed for bankruptcy in Pennsylvania, pausing the claims against it a week before trial.

  • July 10, 2024

    Worker Says Law Firm Fired Her For Flagging Harassment

    A law firm brushed off a former accounts payable specialist's complaints that a male contractor was harassing her, telling her his actions were "laughable," and then fired her after she continued to bring up his conduct, she told a Virginia federal court.

  • July 10, 2024

    Atlanta, Ex-Worker Want Trial Rescheduled In Retaliation Case

    The city of Atlanta and a former city department head who says she was fired after blowing the whistle on failures in its immigrant outreach services asked a Georgia federal judge on Tuesday to reschedule a jury trial set to start in August to allow time for private mediation.

  • July 10, 2024

    6th Circ. Partly Revives Jailer's Disability Suit Over Chemicals

    The Sixth Circuit partially revived a deputy jailer's disability bias suit against a Tennessee county, tossing a district court's ruling that she failed to support discrimination claims over her termination and the county's alleged failure to accommodate her allergy to cleaning chemicals.

  • July 10, 2024

    Ohio Hospital Beats Fired Worker's COVID Testing Bias Suit

    An Ohio federal judge tossed a pharmacist's suit claiming a children's hospital flouted her beliefs by firing her after she refused the COVID-19 vaccine and weekly testing on religious grounds, ruling that she wasn't owed an accommodation that could have hurt hospital business.

  • July 09, 2024

    Ex-SF Transit Worker Tearfully Tells Of Vax-Mandate Firing

    A former San Francisco Bay Area train system police department member who claims the transit agency religiously discriminated with its COVID-19 vaccination mandate testified tearfully on Tuesday that he felt guilt and anxiety after losing his job, saying his family almost had to sell their home.

  • July 09, 2024

    With Chevron's End, LGBTQ+ Healthcare Regs Face New Risk

    The end of Chevron deference is already disrupting regulation meant to protect LGBTQ+ access to healthcare, with three federal judges blocking enforcement of a Biden administration rule prohibiting discrimination based on gender identity in healthcare.

  • July 09, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Revive Pilots' COVID Vax Preemption Fight

    The Sixth Circuit on Tuesday refused to revive a putative class action by Kalitta Air pilots who were fired over their refusal to get the COVID-19 vaccine, finding that the Railway Labor Act precludes the court from hearing their failure-to-accommodate and disability discrimination claims, which must be resolved through arbitration instead.

  • July 09, 2024

    BCBS Unit Fails To Stop Religious Vaccine Objector Suits

    A Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan subsidiary can't escape claims it treated differently employees who sought accommodations from a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, a Michigan federal judge ruled Tuesday, finding it plausible that religious discrimination "was at least a motivating factor" in the way the workers were dealt with.

Expert Analysis

  • 6th Circ. Bias Ruling Shows Job Evaluations Are Key Defense

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    In Wehrly v. Allstate, the Sixth Circuit recently declined to revive a terminated employee’s federal and state religious discrimination and retaliation claims, illustrating that an employer’s strongest defense in such cases is a documented employment evaluation history that justifies an adverse action, says Michael Luchsinger at Segal Mccambridge.

  • Navigating Harassment Complaints From Trans Employees

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent decision in Copeland v. Georgia Department of Corrections, concerning the harassment of a transgender employee, should serve as a cautionary tale for employers, but there are steps that companies can take to create a more inclusive workplace and mitigate the risks of claims from transgender and nonbinary employees, say Patricia Konopka and Ann Thomas at Stinson.

  • Employer Considerations Before Title IX Rule Goes Into Effect

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    While the U.S. Department of Education's final rule on Title IX is currently published as an unofficial version, institutions and counsel should take immediate action to ensure they are prepared for the new requirements, including protections for LGBTQ+ and pregnant students and employees, before it takes effect in August, say Jeffrey Weimer and Cori Smith at Reed Smith.

  • 5 Employer Actions Now Risky After Justices' Title VII Ruling

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    Last week in Muldrow v. St. Louis, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that harm didn't have to be significant to be considered discriminatory under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, making five common employer actions vulnerable to litigation, say Kellee Kruse and Briana Scholar at The Employment Law Group.

  • Breaking Down EEOC's Final Rule To Implement The PWFA

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    Attorneys at Littler highlight some of the key provisions of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's final rule and interpretive guidance implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, which is expected to be effective June 18, and departures from the proposed rule issued in August 2023.

  • How To Prepare As Employee Data Reporting Deadlines Near

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    As filing deadlines approach, government contractors and private companies alike should familiarize themselves with recent changes to federal and California employee data reporting requirements and think strategically about registration of affirmative action plans to minimize the risk of being audited, say Christopher Durham and Zev Grumet-Morris at Duane Morris.

  • Address Complainants Before They Become Whistleblowers

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    A New York federal court's dismissal of a whistleblower retaliation claim against HSBC Securities last month indicates that ignored complaints to management combined with financial incentives from regulators create the perfect conditions for a concerned and disgruntled employee to make the jump to federal whistleblower, say attorneys at Cooley.

  • Why Corporate DEI Challenges Increasingly Cite Section 1981

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    As legal challenges to corporate diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives increase in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on race-conscious college admissions last year, Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act is supplanting Title VII as conservative activist groups' weapon of choice, say Mike Delikat and Tierra Piens at Orrick.

  • Inside OMB's Update On Race And Ethnicity Data Collection

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    The Office of Management and Budget's new guidelines for agency collection of data on race and ethnicity reflect societal changes and the concerns of certain demographics, but implementation may be significantly burdensome for agencies and employers, say Joanna Colosimo and Bill Osterndorf at DCI Consulting.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

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    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • The Shifting Landscape Of Physician Disciplinary Proceedings

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    Though hospitals have historically been able to terminate doctors' medical staff privileges without fear of court interference, recent case law has demonstrated that the tides are turning, especially when there is evidence of unlawful motivations, say Dylan Newton and Michael Horn at Archer & Greiner.

  • Anti-DEI Complaints Filed With EEOC Carry No Legal Weight

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    Recently filed complaints against several companies' diversity, equity and inclusion programs alleging unlawful discrimination against white people do not require a response from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and should not stop employers from rooting out ongoing discriminatory practices, says former EEOC general counsel David Lopez.

  • How DEI Programs Are Being Challenged In Court And Beyond

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    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's affirmative action decision last year declaring the consideration of race in university admissions unconstitutional, employers should keep abreast of recent litigation challenging diversity, equity and inclusion training programs, as well as legislation both supporting and opposing DEI initiatives in the workplace, say attorneys at Skadden.