Discrimination

  • July 03, 2024

    Calif. Watchdog Notches $14.4M Deal In Microsoft Leave Fight

    Microsoft agreed to shell out $14.4 million to end a California Civil Rights Department's lawsuit claiming that it discriminated against employees who take protected employment leaves, the department announced Wednesday.

  • July 03, 2024

    White Male Anchor Says CBS' Diversity Goals Got Him Fired

    CBS Broadcasting Inc. needed to solve its "white problem" so it excluded an experienced white male anchor from promotional events and then fired him in order to replace him with a young Black reporter, a complaint filed in California federal court said.

  • July 03, 2024

    4 Argument Sessions Bias Attys Should Watch In July

    A diver will defend her win in a sex bias case before the Sixth Circuit, while the U.S. Postal Service and a Christian mailman who wanted Sundays off will cross swords in district court after the U.S. Supreme Court revived his case last summer. Here are four arguments that lawyers should have on their radar in July.

  • July 03, 2024

    Del. DOT Must Face Asian Worker's Promotion Bias Suit

    The Delaware Department of Transportation can't defeat a former engineer's lawsuit claiming he was repeatedly passed over for promotion because he's Asian, a federal judge ruled, finding the worker provided enough evidence to cast doubt on the agency's rationale that his interview performance was lackluster.

  • July 03, 2024

    Constangy Hires Greenspoon Marder Partner In LA

    Constangy Brooks Smith & Prophete LLP has hired a former deputy attorney general for the California Department of Justice, who is joining from Greenspoon Marder LLP where she led that firm's employment litigation group, the firm announced Wednesday.

  • July 03, 2024

    Mass. Court Partially Revives Trooper's Bias Suit

    An intermediate-level appellate panel in Massachusetts on Wednesday partially revived a suit brought by a state trooper who claimed she faced retaliation and was treated differently after breaking up with a colleague.

  • July 03, 2024

    Staffing Firm To Pay $500K To End EEOC Sex Harassment Suit

    A staffing firm will pay out $500,000 to resolve a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit accusing it of failing to intervene when the female workers it placed at a raisin company reported sexual harassment, according to a filing in California federal court.

  • July 03, 2024

    After Chevron Deference: What Lawyers Need To Know

    This term, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Chevron deference, a precedent established 40 years ago that said when judges could defer to federal agencies' interpretations of law in rulemaking. Here, catch up with Law360's coverage of what is likely to happen next.

  • July 02, 2024

    Northwestern Hires 'Mediocre' Minorities Over Men, Suit Says

    Northwestern University's law school favors hiring women and minority faculty candidates with "mediocre and undistinguished records" over better-credentialed white men, a conservative group claims in a lawsuit filed Tuesday in Chicago federal court, a year after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down affirmative action in higher education admissions.

  • July 02, 2024

    FilmOn Founder Must Pay $900M In Sexual Battery Verdict

    Alki David, founder of FilmOn and heir to a Coca-Cola bottling fortune already facing more than $80 million in judgments related to sexual battery or sexual assault lawsuits, was ordered by a Los Angeles jury to pay a staggering $900 million to a former employee who accused him of raping her, according to documents posted in the case Tuesday.

  • July 02, 2024

    Charter Justified Firing Of Lactating Worker, 10th Circ. Says

    A Tenth Circuit panel on Tuesday sided with Charter Communications over an employee who alleged she was fired for seeking reasonable accommodations to pump breast milk at work, with the panel finding Charter supplied a legitimate reason for her termination.

  • July 02, 2024

    2nd Circ. Backs County Win In Ex-Director's ADA Bias Suit

    The Second Circuit refused on Tuesday to revive a lawsuit that a former fiscal affairs director brought against a New York county's policymaking branch, saying he failed to show that a planned back surgery — and not his poor performance — cost him his job.

  • July 02, 2024

    NY County Must Face Ex-Assistant DA's Leave Bias Suit

    A New York county can't dodge a former assistant district attorney's suit claiming she was unlawfully fired for requesting time off following her husband's cancer diagnosis, with a federal judge ruling more information is needed to determine whether she was misled about her eligibility for leave.

  • July 02, 2024

    8th Circ. Curbs An Employer Defense In Disability Bias Cases

    The Eighth Circuit recently made it easier for disabled workers to get bias cases to trial by reining in a legal shield employers can deploy against Americans with Disabilities Act claims, a step one disability law expert called "revolutionary."

  • July 02, 2024

    11th Circ. Revives School Worker's Religious Bias Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit reinstated a suit Tuesday from a worker who claimed a Florida school board illegally denied his request to avoid working on the Sabbath, ruling that he did enough to show the board's decision making may have been discriminatory.

  • July 02, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs Hospital's Win In Black Physician's Bias Suit

    The Seventh Circuit declined Tuesday to reinstate a Black physician's lawsuit alleging she was forced to quit because she was paid less than other doctors to do more work, saying she failed to show she was treated differently from white employees.

  • July 02, 2024

    Metal Co. Can't Narrow EEOC's Race Discrimination Suit

    A metal galvanization company can't cut several workers from a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit claiming it failed to address rampant racist language at its facility, a New York federal judge ruled, rejecting the employer's argument that the employees neglected the company's anti-discrimination policies.

  • July 02, 2024

    DC Circ. Revives Asian ATF Agent's Promotion Bias Suit

    The D.C. Circuit revived a special agent's suit Tuesday alleging he lost a promotion in the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives for complaining he was denied job opportunities for being Asian American, finding the lower court overlooked details that supported his claims.

  • July 02, 2024

    DLA Piper Tells Judge Fired Associate Got Proper Discovery

    Counsel for DLA Piper LLP told a Manhattan federal judge on Tuesday the firm has provided responsive information to a former associate who claims she was unlawfully fired while pregnant, adding it is confident her termination was lawful.

  • July 02, 2024

    Wendy's Franchisee Settles EEOC Suit Over Workforce Data

    A company that operates Wendy's restaurants reached a deal with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to end a suit claiming it shirked its legal responsibility to timely submit its workforce demographic data, a filing in Ohio federal court said.

  • July 01, 2024

    High Court's 1-2 Punch Sets Up Long-Standing Regs For KO

    By ending its term with a stinging combination against federal agencies, the U.S. Supreme Court's conservative bloc left behind a bruised bureaucracy and a regulatory system that's now vulnerable to a barrage of incoming attacks.

  • July 01, 2024

    UC Riverside Profs Win Combined $6.1M In Retaliation Trial

    Two former University of California, Riverside professors were awarded a total of $6.1 million in damages by a jury that found they were retaliated against in violation of the California Whistleblower Protection Act after making official complaints about alleged misdeeds their supervisor was engaging in, including misuse of government funds. 

  • July 01, 2024

    Chevron's End May Tilt Challenges To Pregnant Worker Rule

    The recent elimination of a long-standing doctrine that directed judges to defer to federal agencies' interpretations of ambiguous statutory language gives potentially potent ammunition to opponents of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's regulations implementing the Pregnant Worker Fairness Act, attorneys say.

  • July 01, 2024

    FCC Urged To Delay Broadcast Reporting Rule During Lawsuit

    Religious broadcasters and advocacy groups are urging the Federal Communications Commission to halt collection of workforce race and gender demographics at television and radio broadcasters while a challenge to a reinstated rule proceeds in the Fifth Circuit.

  • July 01, 2024

    Nev. Supreme Court Won't Give Gruden 2nd Try Against NFL

    The Nevada Supreme Court will not rehear a decision to send to arbitration former Las Vegas Raiders head coach Jon Gruden's defamation lawsuit against the NFL, a three-member court panel ruled Monday.

Expert Analysis

  • Employer Best Practices In Light Of NY Anti-Trans Bias Report

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    A recent report from the New York State Department of Labor indicates that bias against transgender and nonbinary people endures in the workplace, highlighting why employers must create supportive policies and gender transition plans, not only to mitigate the risk of discrimination claims, but also to foster an inclusive work culture, says Michelle Phillips at Jackson Lewis.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Protecting Vulnerable Workers

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    It's meaningful that the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's strategic enforcement plan prioritizes protecting vulnerable workers, particularly as the backlash to workplace racial equity and diversity, equity and inclusion programs continues to unfold, says Dariely Rodriguez at the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.

  • 4 Steps To Navigating Employee Dementia With Care

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    A recent Connecticut suit brought by an employee terminated after her managers could not reasonably accommodate her Alzheimer's-related dementia should prompt employers to plan how they can compassionately address older employees whose cognitive impairments affect their job performance, while also protecting the company from potential disability and age discrimination claims, says Robin Shea at Constangy.

  • Compliance Tips For Employers Facing An Aggressive EEOC

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    This year, the combination of an aggressive U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, a renewed focus on large-scale recruiting and hiring claims, and the injection of the complicated landscape of AI in the workplace means employers should be prepared to defend, among other things, their use of technology during the hiring process, say attorneys at Seyfarth Shaw.

  • Employer Lessons From Nixed Calif. Arbitration Agreement

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    A California state appeals court’s recent decision to throw out an otherwise valid arbitration agreement, where an employee claimed a confusing electronic signature system led her to agree to unfair terms, should alert employers to scrutinize any waivers or signing procedures that may appear to unconscionably favor the company, say Guillermo Tello and Monique Eginli at Clark Hill.

  • EEO-1 Ruling May Affect Other Gov't Agency Disclosures

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    By tightly construing a rarely litigated but frequently asserted term, a California federal court’s ruling that the Freedom of Information Act does not exempt reports to the U.S. Department of Labor on workplace demographics could expand the range of government contractor information susceptible to public disclosure, says John Zabriskie at Foley & Lardner.

  • Workplace Speech Policies Limit Legal And PR Risks

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    As workers increasingly speak out on controversies like the 2024 elections and the Israel-Hamas war, companies should implement practical workplace expression policies and plans to protect their brands and mitigate the risk of violating federal and state anti-discrimination and free speech laws, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Preserving Legal System Access

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    The track records of and public commentary from U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission leaders — including two recently confirmed Democratic appointees — can provide insight into how the agency may approach access to justice priorities, as identified in its latest strategic enforcement plan, says Aniko Schwarcz at Cohen Milstein.

  • Mitigating Compliance And Litigation Risks Of Evolving Tech

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    Amid artificial intelligence and other technological advances, companies must prepare for the associated risks, including a growing suite of privacy regulations, enterprising class action theories and consumer protection challenges, and proliferating disclosure obligations, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • A Focused Statement Can Ease Employment Mediation

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    Given the widespread use of mediation in employment cases, attorneys should take steps to craft mediation statements that efficiently assist the mediator by focusing on key issues, strengths and weaknesses of a claim, which can flag key disputes and barriers to a settlement, says Darren Rumack at Klein & Cardali.

  • Vaccine Accommodation Suits Show Risk Of Blanket Policies

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    A recent federal class action alleging Tyson Foods inappropriately applied a one-size-fits-all response to Arkansas employees seeking religious COVID-19 vaccine exemptions, with similar suits going back to 2022, should remind employers to individually consider every worker request for a religious accommodation, say Christopher Pardo and Elizabeth Sherwood at Hunton.

  • Workplace Challenges Amid Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

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    Recent tension over the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has caused challenges in the employment sphere, sparking the question of whether employees can be legally disciplined for speaking out on issues related to the conflict, which depends on various circumstances, says Alok Nadig at Sanford Heisler.