Discrimination

  • July 01, 2024

    Workers Accuse Kanye West Of 'Extreme' Racism On The Job

    Eight young app developers have sued "Heartless" rapper Ye, formerly known as Kanye West, his company and its former chief of staff, conservative firebrand Milo Yiannopoulos, in California federal court, alleging they fostered a hostile and abusive working environment, subjecting them to "extreme racism," bullying and harassment without pay.

  • July 01, 2024

    Ill., Northshore Say Anti-Vax Case Not About Religious Liberty

    A nurse working for a Northshore Health unit in Illinois should be permanently blocked from pursuing employment deprivation claims over her initial denial of a COVD-19 religious vaccine exemption, the health facility said, arguing she is using a state conscience law as a "sword" against COVID-19 protections. 

  • July 01, 2024

    Ex-LSU Football Director Seeks Full 5th Circ. Bias Suit Review

    A former Louisiana State University football director asked the Fifth Circuit on Monday for a full-court review of its ruling that her bias suit does not plausibly show that school officials violated public records law by not turning over sexual harassment investigation records.

  • July 01, 2024

    ACLU, NLRB Prosecutors Clash Over Outspoken Atty's Firing

    National Labor Relations Board prosecutors and the American Civil Liberties Union filed dueling briefs in a board challenge to an ex-policy attorney's firing, with prosecutors claiming she was fired for speaking out about bad bosses and the group claiming she relentlessly smeared Black supervisors.

  • July 01, 2024

    8th Circ. Revives ADA Suit By Diabetic Hardee's Manager

    The Eighth Circuit breathed new life Monday into a former manager's lawsuit alleging a Hardee's franchisee fired her because she has diabetes, saying a jury could sort out whether she was unlawfully fired after a diabetic episode that she claimed precluded her from calling in sick.

  • July 01, 2024

    Opera Singer Says Anti-Gay Bias Behind U. Of Michigan Firing

    An opera singer said he was improperly canned from his tenured professorship by the University of Michigan in 2020 after allegations surfaced that he and his husband raped a musician a decade earlier, arguing that he faced harsher punishments and biased proceedings because he is gay.

  • July 01, 2024

    AbbVie Hit With Age, Gender Bias Suit By Former Salesman

    AbbVie Inc. fired a regional sales director as a pretext to avoid paying him for stock options and because of retaliatory complaints by two women who had received poor performance reviews, according to a suit filed in Massachusetts state court.

  • July 01, 2024

    Jury Sides With Amazon In Suit Over Post-Surgery Leave

    Amazon didn't have to give a former employee additional time off after gum disease surgery because she wasn't entitled to medical leave and didn't have a disability under federal law, a Florida federal jury found as it sided with the company.

  • July 01, 2024

    Call Center Strikes Deal To Exit EEOC Disability Bias Probe

    A Columbus, Ohio, call center will pay $23,000 to resolve an investigation that the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission launched into allegations that the company refused to accommodate an employee with a disability and then placed her on unpaid leave.

  • July 01, 2024

    Supreme Court Widens Window To Challenge Federal Regs

    Legal challenges to federal regulations can be brought outside the normal statute of limitations if someone isn't adversely affected until after the six-year window of time to file suit, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday.

  • June 28, 2024

    Chevron's End Is Just The Start For Energized Agency Foes

    By knocking down a powerful precedent that has towered over administrative law for 40 years, the U.S. Supreme Court's right wing Friday gave a crowning achievement to anti-agency attorneys. But for those attorneys, the achievement is merely a means to an end, and experts expect a litigation blitzkrieg to materialize quickly in the aftermath.

  • June 28, 2024

    In Chevron Case, Justices Trade One Unknown For Another

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overrule a decades-old judicial deference doctrine may cause the "eternal fog of uncertainty" surrounding federal agency actions to dissipate and level the playing field in challenges of government policies, but lawyers warn it raises new questions over what rules courts must follow and how judges will implement them.

  • June 28, 2024

    PAGA Reforms Clear Calif. Assembly, Head To Newsom's Desk

    California legislators in both the Senate and Assembly overwhelmingly backed big changes to California's Private Attorneys General Act, including an adjustment to how penalties are assessed to employers and awarded to employees, sending the package to Gov. Gavin Newsom's desk.

  • June 28, 2024

    4th Circ. Backs Bank's Win In Black Worker's Bias Suit

    The Fourth Circuit on Friday declined to reinstate a lawsuit that a Black former manager brought against a bank accusing it of firing her because she complained about racial bias, saying she failed to rebut the company's argument that she was let go because of her poor performance.

  • June 28, 2024

    Fired BlueCross Worker Gets $680K Jury Win In Vax Bias Suit

    A Tennessee federal jury awarded a former BlueCross BlueShield employee more than $680,000 after it found the insurance company failed to accommodate her when she was fired for refusing its COVID-19 vaccination mandate because of her religious convictions.

  • June 28, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs Mining Co.'s Defeat Of Driver's FMLA Suit

    The Ninth Circuit upheld a mining company's jury win over a truck driver's lawsuit claiming he was fired because he took time off after a workplace injury, saying Friday that employers don't have to rely on medical evidence to challenge a doctor's diagnosis under federal medical leave law.

  • June 28, 2024

    Nonprofit To Pay $1M To End EEOC Disability Bias Suit

    A nonprofit that provides career opportunities for individuals with disabilities agreed Friday to pay $1 million to resolve a lawsuit from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission accusing it of failing to provide sign language interpreters and firing employees who needed to take medical leave.

  • June 28, 2024

    8th Circ. Reopens Healthcare Worker's Vaccine Bias Case

    The Eighth Circuit revived a physical therapist's lawsuit Friday alleging a healthcare nonprofit treated her differently because she had a religious exemption from its COVID-19 vaccine mandate, telling the lower court to assess her case through the lens of a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision.

  • June 28, 2024

    Eric Trump Can Shield Most Docs In Ex-Aide's Retaliation Suit

    Eric Trump can assert attorney-client privilege to avoid turning over most of a batch of emails sought by Trump 2016 campaign aide Arlene "AJ" Delgado in her pregnancy retaliation suit claiming she was banished from former President Donald Trump's orbit after a fellow staffer got her pregnant.

  • June 28, 2024

    Morgan Lewis Employment Litigator Jumps To Vedder Price

    Vedder Price has hired an employment litigator from Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP as a shareholder in its Chicago office, the firm announced Friday.

  • June 28, 2024

    A Year After Justices Scrap Affirmative Action, DEI Rebounds

    Workplace diversity, equity and inclusion efforts took a hit after the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a blockbuster decision one year ago scrapping affirmative action in college admissions, but experts say employer interest in crafting DEI programs is bouncing back.

  • June 28, 2024

    EEOC Says Claims Of Trans Worker's Harassment Are Valid

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission urged an Illinois federal court to keep afloat its suit accusing a hog farm of allowing its president and a worker to harass a transgender female employee, saying it put forward enough details to back up its claims.

  • June 28, 2024

    High Court Enters July With 3 Rulings To Go

    In a rare move, the U.S. Supreme Court will issue opinions into the beginning of July as the court tries to clear its merits docket of three remaining cases dealing with presidential immunity, whether governments can control social media platforms' content moderation policies and the appropriate deadline to challenge agency action. 

  • June 28, 2024

    Supreme Court Strikes Down Chevron Deference

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday overturned a decades-old precedent that instructed judges about when they could defer to federal agencies' interpretations of law in rulemaking, depriving courts of a commonly used analytic tool and leaving lots of questions about what comes next.

  • June 27, 2024

    Tesla Error Doomed Bid To Arbitrate Race Bias Suit, Court Says

    Tesla must face a Black ex-employee's claims of race discrimination in court, a California appeals court ruled Wednesday, affirming a lower court's finding that the electric vehicle maker lost its chance to arbitrate the claims after it failed to pay arbitration fees on time.

Expert Analysis

  • Water Cooler Talk: Insights On Noncompetes From 'The Office'

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    Troutman Pepper’s Tracey Diamond, Evan Gibbs, Constance Brewster and Jim Earle compare scenarios from “The Office” to the complex world of noncompetes and associated tax issues, as employers are becoming increasingly hesitant to look to noncompete provisions amid a potential federal ban.

  • High Court's Job Bias Questions May Predict Title VII Ruling

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    Employers may be able to predict — and prepare for — important changes to workplace discrimination laws by examining the questions the U.S. Supreme Court asked during oral arguments for Muldrow v. St. Louis, where several justices seemed to favor a low threshold for Title VII suits, says Wendy LaManque at Pryor Cashman.

  • 2 Cases Highlight NJ Cannabis Employment Law Uncertainties

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    More than two years after its enactment, the employee protections and employer obligations in New Jersey's Cannabis Regulatory, Enforcement Assistance and Marketplace Modernization Act remain unsettled, and two recent lawsuits draw attention to the law's enforceability and its intersection with federal law, say Ruth Rauls at Saul Ewing and David White at Seton Hall.

  • 3 Compliance Reminders For Calif. Employers In 2024

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    As we enter into the new year, several recent updates to California employment law — including minimum wage and sick leave requirements — necessitate immediate compliance actions for employers, says Daniel Pyne at Hopkins & Carley.

  • Sex Harassment Arbitration Exemption: Devil Is In The Date

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    A Federal Arbitration Act amendment that exempts workplace sexual harassment claims from arbitration is muddled in ongoing confusion about its chronological reach — and as many such cases begin to run up against applicable statutes of limitations, the clock is ticking for claimants to bring their actions in court, says Abe Melamed at Signature Resolution.

  • Top 10 Employer Resolutions For 2024

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    From technological leaps to sea changes in labor policy to literal sea changes, 2024 provides opportunities for employers to face big-picture questions that will shape their business for years to come, say Allegra Lawrence-Hardy and Lisa Haldar at Lawrence & Bundy.

  • Lessons Learned From 2023's Top FMLA Decisions

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    This year’s most significant Family and Medical Leave Act decisions offer lessons on the act's technical requirements, including the definition of serious health condition, compliance with notice requirements and whether it is permissible to give an employee substantial extra work upon their return from leave, says Linda Dwoskin at Dechert.

  • Artificial Intelligence Is In Need Of Regulation — But How?

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    Since most of the artificial intelligence-related laws in 2023 were part of more extensive consumer privacy law, the U.S. still has a lot of work to do to build consensus on how to oversee AI, and even who should do the regulating, before moving forward on specific and reasonable guidelines as AI's capabilities grow, say Nick Toufexis and Paul Saputo at Saputo Toufexis.

  • Lessons Learned From 2023's Top ADA Decisions

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    This year saw the courts delving into the complexities of employee accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act in the post-pandemic workplace, going beyond bright-line rules with fact-intensive inquiries that are likely to create uncertainty for employers, says Linda Dwoskin at Dechert.

  • What's Ahead For Immigrant Employee Rights Enforcement

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s increased enforcement related to immigration-based employment discrimination is coupled with pending constitutional challenges to administrative tribunals, suggesting employers should leverage those headwinds when facing investigations or class action-style litigation, say attorneys at Jones Day.

  • Top 10 Whistleblowing And Retaliation Events Of 2023

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and federal and state courts made 2023 another groundbreaking year for whistleblower litigation and retaliation developments, including the SEC’s massive whistleblower awards, which are likely to continue into 2024 and further incentivize individuals to submit tips, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • 10 Steps To Reduce Risks From AI Employment Tools

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    In light of the White House’s recent executive order on responsible use of artificial intelligence, companies using AI tools to make employment decisions should take steps to understand and mitigate the legal risks posed by these products and keep up with the rapidly evolving regulations that govern them, say attorneys at Cooley.

  • What Employers Can Learn From EEOC's 2023 ADA Priorities

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    Between a spike in Americans with Disabilities Act suits filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 2023 and the agency’s newly released priorities, the EEOC has provided employers a preview of several ADA issues — like web accessibility, pregnancy discrimination and inflexible policies — it will likely focus enforcement on next year, says Stacy Bunck at Ogletree.