Environmental

  • June 24, 2024

    Ill. Landowners Challenge FERC Moves On $7B Power Line

    Illinois residents, farmers and landowners launched a fresh challenge to the $7 billion Grain Belt Express high-voltage power line, telling the D.C. Circuit that when the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approved an amended negotiated rate authority, it ignored clean energy giant Invenergy's unsanctioned purchase of the project in 2020.

  • June 24, 2024

    IRS Finalizes Limits To Partnership Conservation Easements

    The Internal Revenue Service finalized rules Monday that curb the conservation easement tax deduction claimed by certain partnerships, with some changes to last year's proposed version, such as limiting the opportunity for entities to adjust their tax returns to avoid the new restrictions.

  • June 24, 2024

    Australian, Canadian Uranium Miners Ink $835M Combo Deal

    Australian mining company Paladin Energy Ltd. has agreed to buy Canada's Fission Uranium Corp. for CA$1.14 billion ($835 million), the companies said in a Monday statement. 

  • June 24, 2024

    No Coverage For $3M Logging Injury Verdict, 4th Circ. Affirms

    The Fourth Circuit has affirmed that an insurer doesn't have to cover a $3 million jury verdict over a man's logging injuries, finding that a North Carolina federal court correctly decided that a broad worker injury exclusion was applicable.

  • June 24, 2024

    US DOT Final Rule Ups Freight Rail Hazmat Disclosures

    Freight railroads must provide more detailed, real-time information on trains transporting hazardous materials to state and local first responders, under a new U.S. Department of Transportation final rule announced Monday that was largely spurred by last year's fiery derailment in East Palestine, Ohio.

  • June 24, 2024

    NM Sued Over Sustainable Building Credit Award Process

    A New Mexico apartment complex alleges that the state violated its due process rights after it was denied sustainable building tax credits for most of its units, according to a complaint filed in federal court.

  • June 24, 2024

    Covestro, Abu Dhabi Oil In 'Concrete' Talks For $12.5B Deal

    German chemicals group Covestro AG said Monday it is advancing its talks to potentially sell the business to the Abu Dhabi National Oil Co. after the United Arab Emirates' oil group upped its bid to more than €11.7 billion ($12.5 billion).

  • June 24, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Rethink Partial Revival Of Sanofi Pollution Suit

    The full Sixth Circuit has declined to review a split panel's decision reviving parts of a Sanofi unit's lawsuit against a Tennessee landfill owner it accused of improperly shuttering the dump, which then led to the contamination of water at its property.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices Will Review Request To Rein In NEPA Requirements

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday granted seven Utah counties' request that it review a D.C. Circuit decision revoking federal approval of a rail line to transport crude oil from Utah.

  • June 21, 2024

    DOL Says Union's Farm Wage Challenge Too Late

    The U.S. Department of Labor has pushed back against a challenge to rules introduced in 2022 that a Washington union said are depressing farmworkers' wages, telling a federal judge Friday that the union should have objected during the rule-making period.

  • June 21, 2024

    SEC Bypassed Congress On Climate Regs, Suing States Say

    A coalition of Republican-led states suing the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over recently adopted climate disclosure regulations presented their opening pitch for vacating those regulations to the Eighth Circuit on Friday, arguing that Congress has passed on the opportunity to demand climate risk reporting from publicly traded companies.

  • June 21, 2024

    Fed Circ. Revives Gov't Defenses In Land Underpayment Case

    The Federal Circuit on Friday revived a dispute alleging that the U.S. Forest Service underpaid for a property, saying the U.S. Court of Federal Claims wrongly rejected the agency's arguments that the seller shouldn't have relied on a disputed appraisal when selling.

  • June 21, 2024

    Feds, Enviros Spar Over Power Line Crossing Through Refuge

    The federal government and sparring environmental groups both called on a Wisconsin federal court to grant them judgment in litigation seeking to upend a land exchange that would allow a high-voltage transmission line to cross part of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge.

  • June 21, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Backs Subsidy Duties For Canadian Wind Towers

    A Canadian wind tower manufacturer can't get a break on countervailing duties despite being upfront about errors in its sales data, with the Federal Circuit ruling Friday that the errors raise the possibility of additional mistakes.

  • June 21, 2024

    NY Judge Says Feds, MTA Fully Vetted Congestion Pricing

    A Manhattan federal judge has said federal and New York transportation agencies meticulously analyzed congestion pricing's potential impacts on traffic, air quality and other factors, rejecting local residents and community groups' claims that the Big Apple's now-paused congestion pricing was improperly approved.

  • June 21, 2024

    Costco Sued Over PFAS In Kirkland Brand Baby Wipes

    Costco is facing a proposed class action over its fragrance-free "natural" baby wipes, which consumers claim are made with toxic levels of forever chemicals, rendering them unsafe for use on children.

  • June 21, 2024

    Calif. Gov. Backs Return Of 2,800 Acres To Shasta Nation

    California Gov. Gavin Newsom has thrown his support behind the return of more than 2,800 acres of ancestral land seized through eminent domain more than a century ago to the Shasta Indian Nation, marking the largest tribal land effort in the state's history.

  • June 21, 2024

    Hawaii DOT Settles Kids' Suit Over Fossil Fuel Use

    The Hawaii Department of Transportation has agreed to implement "transformative changes" to the state's transportation system to achieve zero emissions in all ground transportation and interisland sea and air transportation by 2045, as part of a settlement reached with a group of young people.

  • June 21, 2024

    8 Firms To Lead 4 IPOs Totaling $806M As Action Heats Up

    Eight law firms are slated to guide four initial public offerings estimated to raise a combined $806 million during the week of June 24, potentially closing a slow month for new listings with a bang.

  • June 21, 2024

    Wolverine Inks Deal To End PFAS Coverage Fight

    Footwear company Wolverine and one of its insurers have told a Michigan federal judge that they have reached a settlement in a coverage dispute over underlying chemical exposure actions, saying they "have agreed to a signed, confidential term sheet to resolve this action."

  • June 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Counties Not On Hook For Mich. Dam Collapse

    A Sixth Circuit panel agreed that two Michigan counties can't be forced to compensate homeowners for destructive flooding caused by a dam's collapse, finding Thursday that the counties did not cause the damage to the homeowners' properties.

  • June 21, 2024

    Taxation With Representation: Travers Smith, Potamitis Vekris

    In this week's Taxation With Representation, RSK Group Ltd. gets a £500 million ($632 million) investment, Boston Scientific Corp. acquires Silk Road Medical Inc., Masdar takes a part of Terna Energy SA, and Tate & Lyle PLC buys CP Kelco from JM Huber Corp.

  • June 21, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen JD Wetherspoon sue a Welsh pub over its name in the Intellectual Property Court, ex-professional boxer Amir Khan and his wife file libel action against an influencer, the Performing Right Society hit with a competition claim over music licensing, and Manolete Partners bring action against the directors of a bust investment firm. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 21, 2024

    Feds Offer $850M To Slash Methane From Oil And Gas

    The Biden administration on Friday unveiled the latest prong of its multifaceted plan to cut methane emissions from the oil and gas sector: $850 million worth of federal funding for projects that monitor, measure and reduce emissions from oil and gas infrastructure.

  • June 21, 2024

    Justices Say No Feds, No Dice In Texas-NM Water Deal

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday ruled that Texas, New Mexico and Colorado improperly excluded the federal government from an agreement that resolved a Rio Grande water sharing dispute, rejecting the states' argument that the conflict was theirs alone to settle.

Expert Analysis

  • Keeping Up With Class Actions: A New Era Of Higher Stakes

    Author Photo

    Corporate defendants saw unprecedented settlement numbers across all areas of class action litigation in 2022 and 2023, and this year has kept pace so far, with three settlements that stand out for the nature of the claims and for their high dollar amounts, says Gerald Maatman at Duane Morris.

  • 5 Climate Change Regulatory Issues Insurers Should Follow

    Author Photo

    The climate change landscape for insurers has changed dramatically recently — and not just because of the controversy over the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's climate-related risk disclosure rules, says Thomas Dawson at McDermott.

  • What's Extraordinary About Challenges To SEC Climate Rule

    Author Photo

    A set of ideologically diverse legal challenges to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's climate disclosure rule have been consolidated in the Eighth Circuit via a seldom-used lottery system, and the unpredictability of this process may drive agencies toward a more cautious future approach to rulemaking, say attorneys at Thompson Coburn.

  • Series

    Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • Opinion

    SEC Doesn't Have Legal Authority For Climate Disclosure Rule

    Author Photo

    Instead of making the required legal argument to establish its authority, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's climate-related disclosure rule hides behind more than 1,000 references to materiality to give the appearance that its rule is legally defensible, says Bernard Sharfman at RealClearFoundation.

  • What 100 Federal Cases Suggest About Changes To Chevron

    Author Photo

    With the U.S. Supreme Court poised to overturn or narrow its 40-year-old doctrine of Chevron deference, a review of 100 recent federal district court decisions confirm that changes to the Chevron framework will have broad ramifications — but the magnitude of the impact will depend on the details of the high court's ruling, say Kali Schellenberg and Jon Cochran at LeVan Stapleton.

  • Opinion

    SEC Should Be Allowed To Equip Investors With Climate Info

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's new rule to require more climate-related disclosures will provide investors with much-needed clarity, despite opponents' attempts to challenge the rule with misused legal arguments, say Sarah Goetz at Democracy Forward and Cynthia Hanawalt at Columbia University’s Sabin Center for Climate Change.

  • Microplastics At The Crossroads Of Regulation And Litigation

    Author Photo

    Though there are currently not many federal regulations specifically addressing microplastics as pollutants, regulatory scrutiny and lawsuits asserting consumer protection claims are both on the rise, and manufacturers should take proactive steps to implement preventive measures accordingly, say Aliza Karetnick and Franco Corrado at Morgan Lewis.

  • How Cos. Can Comply With New PFAS Superfund Rule

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's new rule designating two per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances as "hazardous substances" under the Superfund law will likely trigger additional enforcement and litigation at sites across the country — so companies should evaluate any associated reporting obligations and liability risks, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • Understanding The IRC's Excessive Refund Claim Penalty

    Author Photo

    Taxpayers considering protective refund claims pending resolution of major questions in tax cases like Moore v. U.S., which is pending before the U.S. Supreme Court, should understand how doing so may also leave them vulnerable to an excessive refund claim penalty under Internal Revenue Code Section 6676, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Recent Wave Of SEC No-Action Denials May Be Slowing

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in March granted no-action relief to Verizon and others on the grounds that a director resignation bylaw proposal would mean violating Delaware law, bucking recent SEC hesitation toward such relief and showing that articulating a basis in state law is a viable path to exclude a proposal, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • Why RWI Insurers Should Consider Excluding PFAS

    Author Photo

    As regulation of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances escalates, carriers providing representations and warranties insurance should reconsider providing PFAS coverage on a case-by-case basis, say Dave Bartoletti and Ina Avalon at Taft Stettinius.

  • Don't Use The Same Template For Every Client Alert

    Author Photo

    As the old marketing adage goes, consistency is key, but law firm style guides need consistency that contemplates variety when it comes to client alert formats, allowing attorneys to tailor alerts to best fit the audience and subject matter, says Jessica Kaplan at Legally Penned.

  • 10b-5 Litigation Questions Follow Justices' Macquarie Ruling

    Author Photo

    Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court held in Macquarie v. Moab that pure omissions are not actionable under U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Rule 10b–5(b), creating a slightly higher bar for plaintiffs and setting the stage for further litigation over several issues, say Steve Quinlivan and Sean Colligan at Stinson.

  • Series

    Walking With My Dog Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Thanks to my dog Birdie, I've learned that carving out an activity different from the practice of law — like daily outdoor walks that allow you to interact with new people — can contribute to professional success by boosting creativity and mental acuity, as well as expanding your social network, says Sarah Petrie at the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Environmental archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!