Government Contracts

  • July 02, 2024

    Challenge To Army Container Corrective Action Dismissed

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims on Monday swept aside a challenge to the U.S. Army Materiel Command's revamped Army shipping container project.

  • July 02, 2024

    'Idle' Ga. Election Officials Holding Up Suit, Judge Told

    Lawyers for an array of plaintiffs challenging portions of Georgia's 2021 election overhaul law attempted with one hand to convince a federal judge Tuesday not to scuttle their claims before a trial, while with the other urged the court to put the suit on ice until "dysfunctional" elections officials get their act together.

  • July 02, 2024

    Gov't Urged To Gauge TransDigm Deals' Effect On Defense Biz

    Three Democratic lawmakers are pressing the U.S. Department of Defense and antitrust enforcers to review an aerospace company's recent acquisition of two other companies, citing antitrust and price gouging concerns.

  • July 02, 2024

    Alaska Village Hits Army Corps With Gold Mine Permit Suit

    The Native Village of Dot Lake is asking an Alaska federal judge to throw out a permit the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued for an open pit gold mine Kinross Gold Corp. and Peak Gold LLC are developing near the Yukon border.

  • July 01, 2024

    High Court's 1-2 Punch Sets Up Long-Standing Regs For KO

    By ending its term with a stinging combination against federal agencies, the U.S. Supreme Court's conservative bloc left behind a bruised bureaucracy and a regulatory system that's now vulnerable to a barrage of incoming attacks.

  • July 01, 2024

    Guatemala Says $31M Award Can't Be Enforced In U.S.

    Guatemala told a D.C. federal court on Friday that litigation filed by a construction and engineering firm to enforce $31 million in arbitral awards against it must be tossed, saying the underlying arbitration and dispute are entirely Guatemalan in nature.

  • July 01, 2024

    Military Store Service Says Blind Vendors Must Follow Process

    The U.S. Department of Defense asked a federal judge on Monday to dismiss a lawsuit filed by blind entrepreneurs accusing the military of ignoring a law that requires officials to prioritize businesses owned by blind people, arguing that the merchants should have completed the administrative process first.

  • July 01, 2024

    GAO Says CMS Treated Bids On $34M Security Deal Differently

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has sustained a protest over a $34 million Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services task order for information technology security services, saying CMS treated the credentials of key employees differently for the protester and the awardee.

  • July 01, 2024

    Lack Of 'Diligence' Dooms Conn. IT Co.'s Contract Suit

    A Connecticut state judge has thrown out a lawsuit brought by an information technology company that accused a rival of poaching a municipal contract with the city of Hamden in violation of a subcontracting agreement, writing that the parties did not file a joint schedule by a court-ordered deadline.

  • July 01, 2024

    Admiral, CEOs Deny Steering Navy Contracts

    A retired four-star Navy admiral and two executives at a leadership training company pled not guilty to charges of conspiracy and bribery Monday morning in D.C. federal court, vowing to take the U.S. Department of Justice's case to trial.

  • July 01, 2024

    GSK Wants Lab's Zantac Whistleblower Suit Moved To Florida

    GlaxoSmithKline wants a Connecticut laboratory's federal whistleblower lawsuit moved from Pennsylvania to Florida, where a West Palm Beach court has already overseen four years of a multidistrict litigation that GSK said was touched off by the same lab's claims that Zantac breaks down into a cancer-causing chemical.

  • July 01, 2024

    Texas Agency Urges Top Court To End Court Reporter's Suit

    The administrative agency tasked with oversight of court stenography in Texas asked the state's Supreme Court on Friday to shut down a court reporter's push to force it to investigate a digital transcription company, arguing that the agency doesn't have jurisdiction.

  • July 01, 2024

    Supreme Court Widens Window To Challenge Federal Regs

    Legal challenges to federal regulations can be brought outside the normal statute of limitations if someone isn't adversely affected until after the six-year window of time to file suit, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday.

  • June 28, 2024

    Chevron's End Is Just The Start For Energized Agency Foes

    By knocking down a powerful precedent that has towered over administrative law for 40 years, the U.S. Supreme Court's right wing Friday gave a crowning achievement to anti-agency attorneys. But for those attorneys, the achievement is merely a means to an end, and experts expect a litigation blitzkrieg to materialize quickly in the aftermath.

  • June 28, 2024

    Quinn Slammed By Columbia For Its 'Continuing Audacity'

    Columbia University shot back Friday against arguments from Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP that Federal Circuit judges should disregard arguments made by the firm's former client, who says the firm lied to a federal court in Virginia to avoid damaging testimony in a $600 million patent case.

  • June 28, 2024

    CUNY Medical Prof Accused Of Fabricating NIH Grant Apps

    A medical professor at the City College of New York and paid adviser to Cassava Sciences has been indicted on allegations he falsified scientific data in grant applications submitted to the National Institutes of Health on behalf of himself and Cassava, prosecutors announced Friday.

  • June 28, 2024

    In Chevron Case, Justices Trade One Unknown For Another

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overrule a decades-old judicial deference doctrine may cause the "eternal fog of uncertainty" surrounding federal agency actions to dissipate and level the playing field in challenges of government policies, but lawyers warn it raises new questions over what rules courts must follow and how judges will implement them.

  • June 28, 2024

    Navy Accused Of Favoring Mentor-Protege Cos. On $50B Deal

    A Navy contractor has urged a Court of Federal Claims judge to overturn the U.S. Navy's modification to a $50 billion professional services contract, saying the change had given an unfair advantage to mentor-protégé joint ventures and their member companies.

  • June 28, 2024

    NJ Contractor Admits To Defrauding Defense Dept.

    A New Jersey businessman has admitted in federal court to engaging in two multiyear schemes to defraud the U.S. Defense Department on contracts for military equipment parts and agreeing to rig bids for government contracts.

  • June 28, 2024

    House Passes Contentious $833B Defense Spending Bill

    The U.S. House of Representatives on Friday passed an $833 billion bill funding the Pentagon for 2025, amid a veto threat over contentious issues such as cutting funding for Ukraine and a bar on gender-affirming care.

  • June 28, 2024

    Gov't Contracts Of The Month: Space Launches And Satellites

    June saw NASA and the U.S. Space Force doling out billions of dollars for weather satellites, information technology services and national security space launches. Here, Law360 looks at some of the most noteworthy government contracts over the last month.

  • June 28, 2024

    Google Cloud Hires Ex-Federal CISO To Run Gov't Compliance

    Google has hired a former federal chief information security officer and deputy national cyber director to lead global public sector compliance at Google Cloud, where he will work to expand the platform's offerings in artificial intelligence, cloud computing and security to government entities.

  • June 28, 2024

    Buchanan Ingersoll Can't Dump Harrisburg Incinerator Row

    A Pennsylvania appellate court won't let Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC exit long-running litigation over a trash incinerator project that sent the state's capital city into financial distress, ruling Friday that there was still ambiguity about whether the law firm's advice had been correct.

  • June 28, 2024

    NYC Housing Worker Gets Jail In 1st Sentence Of Bribery Bust

    A Manhattan federal judge hit a retired New York City public housing superintendent with a year in prison Friday for taking $7,500 in bribes, a potentially worrisome signal for 69 others charged in a major anti-corruption sweep.

  • June 28, 2024

    High Court Enters July With 3 Rulings To Go

    In a rare move, the U.S. Supreme Court will issue opinions into the beginning of July as the court tries to clear its merits docket of three remaining cases dealing with presidential immunity, whether governments can control social media platforms' content moderation policies and the appropriate deadline to challenge agency action. 

Expert Analysis

  • Mid-2024 FCA Enforcement And Litigation Trends To Watch

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    Reviewing notable False Claims Act trends and enforcement efforts in the last year and a half reveals that healthcare is a key enforcement priority for the U.S. Department of Justice, and the road ahead may bring clarification on Anti-Kickback Statute causation and willfulness standards, along with increased focus on private equity, cybersecurity and self-disclosure, say attorneys at Epstein Becker.

  • What 100 Federal Cases Suggest About Changes To Chevron

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    With the U.S. Supreme Court poised to overturn or narrow its 40-year-old doctrine of Chevron deference, a review of 100 recent federal district court decisions confirm that changes to the Chevron framework will have broad ramifications — but the magnitude of the impact will depend on the details of the high court's ruling, say Kali Schellenberg and Jon Cochran at LeVan Stapleton.

  • Don't Use The Same Template For Every Client Alert

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    As the old marketing adage goes, consistency is key, but law firm style guides need consistency that contemplates variety when it comes to client alert formats, allowing attorneys to tailor alerts to best fit the audience and subject matter, says Jessica Kaplan at Legally Penned.

  • Series

    Walking With My Dog Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Thanks to my dog Birdie, I've learned that carving out an activity different from the practice of law — like daily outdoor walks that allow you to interact with new people — can contribute to professional success by boosting creativity and mental acuity, as well as expanding your social network, says Sarah Petrie at the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Follow The Iron Rule Of Trial Logic

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    Many diligent and eager attorneys include every good fact, point and rule in their trial narratives — spurred by the gnawing fear they’ll be second-guessed for leaving something out — but this approach ignores a fundamental principle of successful trial lawyering, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Unpacking The Interim Vet-Owned Small Biz Verification Rule

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    Government contractors that intend to bid for service-disabled veteran-owned small business set-aside contracts should immediately consider the potential impacts of a recently issued rule that specifies how contracting officers will verify that they have certified their status, say Derek Mullins and Beth Gotthelf at Butzel.

  • The Art Of Asking: Leveraging Your Contacts For Referrals

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    Though attorneys may hesitate to ask for referral recommendations to generate new business, research shows that people want to help others they know, like and trust, so consider who in your network you should approach and how to make the ask, says Rebecca Hnatowski at Edwards Advisory.

  • McKesson May Change How AKS-Based FCA Claims Are Pled

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    The Second Circuit’s analysis in U.S. v. McKesson, an Anti-Kickback Statute-based False Claims Act case, provides guidance for both relators and defendants parsing scienter-related allegations, say Li Yu at Dicello Levitt, Ellen London at London & Stout, and Erica Hitchings at Whistleblower Law.

  • Series

    Being An Equestrian Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Beyond getting experience thinking on my feet and tackling stressful situations, the skills I've gained from horseback riding have considerable overlap with the skills used to practice law, particularly in terms of team building, continuing education, and making an effort to reset and recharge, says Kerry Irwin at Moore & Van Allen.

  • Opinion

    Cyber Regulators Should Rely On Existing Sources Cautiously

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    New incident reporting rules proposed by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency illustrate how the use of definitions, standards and approaches from existing sources can create a complex patchwork of regulations, demonstrating that it is essential for agencies to be clear about expectations and not create unnecessary confusion, says Megan Brown at Wiley.

  • DOE Funding And Cargo Preference Compliance: Key Points

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    Under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, the U.S. Department of Energy will disburse more than $62 billion in financing for innovative energy projects — and recipients must understand their legal obligations related to cargo preference, so they can develop compliance strategies as close to project inception as possible, say attorneys at White & Case.

  • 4 Ways To Refresh Your Law Firm's Marketing Strategy

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    With many BigLaw firms relying on an increasingly obsolete marketing approach that prioritizes stiff professionalism over authentic connection, adopting a few key communications strategies to better connect with today's clients and prospects can make all the difference, say Eric Pacifici and Kevin Henderson at SMB Law.

  • Tips For Balanced Board Oversight After A Cyberincident

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's cybersecurity disclosure rules, as well as recent regulatory enforcement actions bringing board governance under scrutiny, continue to push boards toward active engagement in relation to their cyber-oversight role, despite it being unclear what a board's level of involvement should be, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • Breaking Down DOJ's Individual Self-Disclosure Pilot Program

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s recently announced pilot program aims to incentivize individuals to voluntarily self-disclose corporate misconduct they were personally involved in, complementing a new whistleblower pilot program for individuals not involved in misconduct as well as the government's broader corporate enforcement approach, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • How To Prepare As Employee Data Reporting Deadlines Near

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    As filing deadlines approach, government contractors and private companies alike should familiarize themselves with recent changes to federal and California employee data reporting requirements and think strategically about registration of affirmative action plans to minimize the risk of being audited, say Christopher Durham and Zev Grumet-Morris at Duane Morris.

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