Immigration

  • July 16, 2024

    EB-5 Investors Seek Sanctions Over 'Flight Risk' Defendant Info

    Two dozen Chinese investors who alleged that $13.2 million worth of their investments in a Hawaii resort went missing has urged an Illinois federal judge to sanction developers for not giving them important case information, including contact information for one defendant who they said is an "obvious flight risk."

  • July 16, 2024

    Feds Contest Texas DA's Immunity In Migrant Arrest Law Fight

    Nonprofits challenging Texas' migrant arrest law have urged the Fifth Circuit to reject Texas District Attorney Bill Hicks' claim of immunity, saying his argument that the Fifth Circuit's ruling in a separate case over changes to the state's election code is meritless.

  • July 16, 2024

    Separated Families Worry Trial Delay Would Weaken Memories

    Families seeking redress for alleged psychological harms suffered under the Trump administration's zero-tolerance border policy are urging a California federal court not to grant the government's request to delay their trial, saying natural memory lapses would undermine their case.

  • July 16, 2024

    Texas Says Maritime Expert Shouldn't Testify In Barrier Fight

    Texas moved to exclude a maritime expert witness for the U.S. government in its case challenging the state's barrier installed on the Rio Grande aimed at countering increasing migration, arguing on Tuesday the proposed witness, who plans to testify the barrier obstructs navigability, isn't an expert on buoys, booms or floats.

  • July 16, 2024

    Durbin Probes ICE Healthcare Measures After Death Reports

    Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin, D-Ill., on Tuesday pressed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to explain its protections for medically vulnerable detainees after human rights organizations reported that the agency could have prevented most detainee deaths between 2017 and 2022.

  • July 16, 2024

    The 2024 Diversity Snapshot: What You Need To Know

    Law firms' ongoing initiatives to address diversity challenges have driven another year of progress, with the representation of minority attorneys continuing to improve across the board, albeit at a slower pace than in previous years. Here's our data dive into minority representation at law firms in 2023.

  • July 16, 2024

    These Firms Have The Most Diverse Equity Partnerships

    Law360’s law firm survey shows that firms' efforts to diversify their equity partner ranks are lagging. But some have embraced a broader talent pool at the equity partner level. Here are the ones that stood out.

  • July 15, 2024

    Vegas Biz Group Loses Bid For H-2B Janitors Over Calendars

    A Las Vegas-based Hispanic business group again lost a bid to hire 100 foreign janitors when a U.S. Department of Labor appeals board ruled that calendars the group submitted showed a permanent, rather than seasonal, need for the cleaning staff.

  • July 15, 2024

    Feds Say New Migrant Detention Rules Moot Lawsuit

    The Biden administration asked a California federal court to end a long-running lawsuit challenging the government's practices for placing unaccompanied migrant children, saying it addressed all the issues identified by the court with an April policy change.

  • July 15, 2024

    Feds Outline Eligibility Criteria For Foreign Entrepreneur Rule

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services provided updated guidance on the requirements for foreign entrepreneurs to qualify for short-term immigration benefits under the International Entrepreneur Rule.

  • July 15, 2024

    4th Circ. OKs No Hardship Finding In Mexican Man's Removal

    A Fourth Circuit panel on Monday rejected a petition from a Mexican citizen seeking to halt his removal from the United States, ruling that the Board of Immigration Appeals was right to find that his petition fell short of the extreme hardship standard necessary to prevent removal.

  • July 15, 2024

    Trump Running Mate Is Foe Of DOJ 'Political Prosecutions'

    Donald Trump announced Monday that his running mate will be Ohio Sen. J.D. Vance, who over the last year has gone after the U.S. Department of Justice and Attorney General Merrick Garland for what he deems are political prosecutions of the former president.

  • July 15, 2024

    11th Circ. Affirms Yemeni Man's Removal After Marriage Fraud

    The Eleventh Circuit has affirmed the removal of a Yemeni citizen who fraudulently claimed he was married to a U.S. citizen, rejecting arguments that he has since legitimately married another U.S. woman who he now supports and that his removal proceedings should have been paused while he pursued other visa options.

  • July 15, 2024

    EEOC Commissioner Sonderling To Depart Agency

    EEOC Commissioner Keith Sonderling announced Monday he will leave the agency in August when his term ends, wrapping up a seven-year tenure with the federal government to return to the private sector.

  • July 12, 2024

    Law360 Names 2024's Top Attorneys Under 40

    Law360 is pleased to announce the Rising Stars of 2024, our list of 158 attorneys under 40 whose legal accomplishments belie their age.

  • July 12, 2024

    Loper Bright Is Shaking Up Dozens Of Regulatory Fights

    In the two weeks since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Chevron deference, the landmark decision has emerged as a live issue in dozens of administrative challenges, with federal courts already pausing agency regulations expanding LGBTQ+ rights in education and healthcare and with a wave of parties seeking to use the new decision to win their cases.

  • July 12, 2024

    DHS Says Recent High Court Rulings Doom CBP App Claims

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security said Friday that a pair of recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings addressing the issue of standing mean that two organizations lack the standing to challenge its requirement that migrants use a smartphone app to submit applications.

  • July 12, 2024

    Reservist Found Guilty Of Taking Bribes For Visa Letters

    A U.S. Navy Reserve officer was found guilty in New Hampshire federal court on Friday of accepting bribes from Afghan nationals seeking recommendations for special immigrant visas, green cards reserved for individuals who assist the U.S. military.

  • July 12, 2024

    Texas DA Tells 5th Circ. He's Immune In Border Law Fight

    Texas District Attorney Bill Hicks told the Fifth Circuit its June decision finding another district attorney immune from a suit over changes to the state's election code means he should be shielded from a challenge to the Lone Star State's migrant arrest law.

  • July 12, 2024

    Judge Nixes Fraud Suit, Slams Atty's Fox Rothschild Remarks

    A New Jersey federal judge threw out a fraud and malpractice suit brought against Fox Rothschild by two men who said the firm was "knowingly and willfully robbing their immigration clients" and warned their attorney over prior comments he made to Law360 regarding the case.

  • July 11, 2024

    Ex-Judges Say 11th Circ. Wrong On Authority For Visa Petitions

    Former immigration judges urged the U.S. Supreme Court to unravel the Eleventh Circuit's ruling that the courts cannot review a revoked visa petition, saying the ruling denies immigrants important judicial protections based on factors outside their control.

  • July 11, 2024

    DACA Recipient, Credit Union Settle Home Loan Bias Suit

    A beneficiary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program has reached a settlement with an Oregon credit union to end claims that he was unlawfully denied a home equity loan based on his immigration status.

  • July 11, 2024

    2nd Circ. OKs Israeli Man's Removal After Wife Ends Support

    The Second Circuit on Thursday rejected an appeal from an Israeli man fighting deportation following a sham marriage to a U.S. citizen, finding his conditional permanent resident status ended since he didn't submit a joint petition with his spouse to remove the conditions of his status after she withdrew support.

  • July 11, 2024

    2nd Circ. Says Unreported Violence Doesn't Doom Asylum Bid

    The Second Circuit on Thursday said the Board of Immigration Appeals must reconsider an asylum bid from a Honduran woman claiming family abuse and rape by a criminal, finding that evidence of the difficulties women face in reporting violence and the government's ineffective response to such reports was ignored.

  • July 10, 2024

    3rd Circ. Says Pretrial Detention Bars Bid For Removal Relief

    A split Third Circuit on Wednesday refused to revive a Honduran man's bid for deportation relief, saying the over 1,000 days he spent in detention before being sentenced for sexually assaulting his stepdaughter barred him from showing good moral character.

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Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Atty Well-Being Efforts Ignore Root Causes Of The Problem

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    The legal industry is engaged in a critical conversation about lawyers' mental health, but current attorney well-being programs primarily focus on helping lawyers cope with the stress of excessive workloads, instead of examining whether this work culture is even fundamentally compatible with lawyer well-being, says Jonathan Baum at Avenir Guild.

  • Series

    Skiing And Surfing Make Me A Better Lawyer

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    The skills I’ve learned while riding waves in the ocean and slopes in the mountains have translated to my legal career — developing strong mentor relationships, remaining calm in difficult situations, and being prepared and able to move to a backup plan when needed, says Brian Claassen at Knobbe Martens.

  • Justices' Removal Ruling Presents Hurdles, But Offers Clarity

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Campos-Chaves v. Garland and two other consolidated cases endorses a multistep notice practice that could impair noncitizens' access to adequate judicial notice, but its resolution of a longstanding circuit split also provides much-needed clarity, says Devin Connolly at Reeves Immigration Law Group.

  • Unpacking The Circuit Split Over A Federal Atty Fee Rule

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    Federal circuit courts that have addressed Rule 41(d) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure are split as to whether attorney fees are included as part of the costs of a previously dismissed action, so practitioners aiming to recover or avoid fees should tailor arguments to the appropriate court, says Joseph Myles and Lionel Lavenue at Finnegan.

  • After A Brief Hiccup, The 'Rocket Docket' Soars Back To No. 1

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    The Eastern District of Virginia’s precipitous 2022 fall from its storied rocket docket status appears to have been a temporary aberration, as recent statistics reveal that the court is once again back on top as the fastest federal civil trial court in the nation, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • Recruitment Trends In Emerging Law Firm Frontiers

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    BigLaw firms are facing local recruitment challenges as they increasingly establish offices in cities outside of the major legal hubs, requiring them to weigh various strategies for attracting talent that present different risks and benefits, says Tom Hanlon at Buchanan Law.

  • Series

    Glassblowing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    I never expected that glassblowing would strongly influence my work as an attorney, but it has taught me the importance of building a solid foundation for your work, learning from others and committing to a lifetime of practice, says Margaret House at Kalijarvi Chuzi.

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

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    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

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