Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • July 01, 2024

    Workers Accuse Kanye West Of 'Extreme' Racism On The Job

    Eight young app developers have sued "Heartless" rapper Ye, formerly known as Kanye West, his company and its former chief of staff, conservative firebrand Milo Yiannopoulos, in California federal court, alleging they fostered a hostile and abusive working environment, subjecting them to "extreme racism," bullying and harassment without pay.

  • July 01, 2024

    July 4 Parade Shooting Survivors In Ill. Sue Smith & Wesson

    The families of victims of the 2022 July Fourth parade shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, are suing Smith & Wesson and firearm retailers in state court, alleging they deliberately marketed the M&P-15, an AR-15-style rifle, to appeal to people like the shooter.

  • July 01, 2024

    4th Circ. Hikes Damages In 'Unite The Right' Rally Suit

    The Fourth Circuit ruled Monday that Virginia's punitive damages cap must be applied on a per-plaintiff basis, reversing a federal district court ruling that had limited a nearly $24 million verdict against white supremacists accused of planning violence at the 2017 "Unite the Right" rally to a total of $350,000.

  • July 01, 2024

    Atty Not 'Annoying' Enough For Restraining Order

    A California appeals court affirmed Monday a finding that a personal injury attorney's aggressive behavior toward another attorney only rose to the level of "annoying" and thus didn't warrant a permanent restraining order, saying the behavior must rise to the level of "seriously annoying" to be considered harassment.

  • July 01, 2024

    NJ Judge Tosses J&J Unit's Libel Claim Over Talc Study

    A New Jersey federal judge has tossed a bankrupt Johnson & Johnson unit's libel suit over a scientific article linking talcum powder to mesothelioma, ruling the challenged statements in the article are scientific conclusions protected by the First Amendment.

  • July 01, 2024

    Top Personal Injury, Med Mal News: 2024 Midyear Report

    A high court ruling over whether bump stocks can be considered machine guns under a federal agency's rule banning the devices and a huge railroad settlement over a Norfolk Southern derailment disaster are among Law360's top personal injury and medical malpractice cases for the first six months of 2024.

  • July 01, 2024

    Talc Victims Can't Block J&J From Filing For Ch. 11 Outside NJ

    A New Jersey federal judge has denied a bid for a restraining order from a group of patients suing Johnson & Johnson over claims they were injured by its talc products, saying their concern that the company would try to file for bankruptcy outside the Garden State is based on speculation and not ripe for litigation.

  • July 01, 2024

    GSK Wants Lab's Zantac Whistleblower Suit Moved To Florida

    GlaxoSmithKline wants a Connecticut laboratory's federal whistleblower lawsuit moved from Pennsylvania to Florida, where a West Palm Beach court has already overseen four years of a multidistrict litigation that GSK said was touched off by the same lab's claims that Zantac breaks down into a cancer-causing chemical.

  • July 01, 2024

    Fla. Court Releases 2006 Epstein Grand Jury Transcripts

    A Florida state court judge on Monday made public the 2006 grand jury transcripts of the Jeffrey Epstein sex abuse investigation after a newspaper persuaded him to reconsider releasing them in light of a new law signed by Gov. Ron DeSantis earlier this year.

  • July 01, 2024

    Feds Say Ex-Magellan Officer's Atty May Have Conflict

    A Donnelly Conroy & Gelhaar LLP attorney's prior representation of co-defendants in a pending fraud case against former executives of medical device company Magellan Diagnostics may have created a disqualifying conflict of interest, lawyers for the government told a Massachusetts federal judge.

  • July 01, 2024

    Conn. Lawmaker Says Cops Mishandled Her Sexual Assault

    A Connecticut state lawmaker took the city of Hartford to federal court, alleging that its Police Department "discounted" her reports of sexual assault and subsequent injuries, and "leaked biased and skewed information" to news outlets after a man attacked her outside a prayer event officers were patrolling.

  • June 28, 2024

    Chevron's End Is Just The Start For Energized Agency Foes

    By knocking down a powerful precedent that has towered over administrative law for 40 years, the U.S. Supreme Court's right wing Friday gave a crowning achievement to anti-agency attorneys. But for those attorneys, the achievement is merely a means to an end, and experts expect a litigation blitzkrieg to materialize quickly in the aftermath.

  • June 28, 2024

    Will 'Moral Victory' In Purdue Ruling Help Plaintiffs?

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision that the Sackler family members who own Purdue Pharma LP cannot be shielded by the bankruptcy code from lawsuits over the opioid crisis reflects the widespread public outrage over their role in the epidemic, but experts say it remains unclear what will happen next for the individuals and governments that have sued the company.

  • June 28, 2024

    CUNY Medical Prof Accused Of Fabricating NIH Grant Apps

    A medical professor at the City College of New York and paid adviser to Cassava Sciences has been indicted on allegations he falsified scientific data in grant applications submitted to the National Institutes of Health on behalf of himself and Cassava, prosecutors announced Friday.

  • June 28, 2024

    Wyndham Can't Escape Ohio Sex Trafficking Liability Suit

    Wyndham Hotels lost its bid to escape a woman's lawsuit alleging it ignored obvious signs she was trafficked for sex at a Knights Inn brand hotel when an Ohio federal judge ruled Friday that she sufficiently alleged the company was directly liable for harming her.

  • June 28, 2024

    In Chevron Case, Justices Trade One Unknown For Another

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overrule a decades-old judicial deference doctrine may cause the "eternal fog of uncertainty" surrounding federal agency actions to dissipate and level the playing field in challenges of government policies, but lawyers warn it raises new questions over what rules courts must follow and how judges will implement them.

  • June 28, 2024

    Report Shows PI Wiped Evidence Of Other Hacks, Mogul Says

    A private investigator in North Carolina deleted 110,000 documents — including data reportedly stolen from an attorney — the night before he was set to testify in a London case against airline mogul Farhad Azima, according to documents filed in federal court.

  • June 28, 2024

    Rite Aid Ch. 11 Plan OK'd With Insurers' Objections Resolved

    A New Jersey bankruptcy judge Friday approved pharmacy chain Rite Aid's Chapter 11 restructuring plan after the company said it had resolved objections from its insurance carriers to how the plan treats their policies.

  • June 28, 2024

    Insurer Says It Owes No Coverage In Hair Relaxer Litigation

    As a beauty manufacturer faces allegations that its line of hair relaxers contain carcinogenic ingredients, Selective Way Insurance Co. has asked a Georgia federal judge to release it from having to cover the company's defense in a sprawling multidistrict litigation.

  • June 28, 2024

    Aviation Co. Escapes Florida Suit Over No-Fuel Plane Crash

    A Florida federal judge has tossed a lawsuit brought against a Miami-based aviation company over a pilot crashing its plane into the ocean after running out of fuel while en route to the Bahamas, ruling that the company wasn't actually in possession of the aircraft during the incident.

  • June 28, 2024

    Northwestern Releases Paul Weiss Report On Hazing Review

    Northwestern University has made public a long-awaited report by former U.S. attorney general and current Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP partner Loretta Lynch finding weaknesses in the school's systems and culture.

  • June 28, 2024

    Girardi's Ch. 7 Evidence Fight May Raise Novel Issues

    Tom Girardi told a California federal judge that FBI agents violated his constitutional rights by obtaining evidence from his law firm's bankruptcy trustee without a search warrant, an argument that, if successful, could hamstring prosecutors in his upcoming wire fraud trial and shake up law enforcement's dealings with trustees.

  • June 28, 2024

    Baldwin Loses Third Bid To Dismiss 'Rust' Shooting Case

    A New Mexico state judge on Friday rejected Alec Baldwin's argument that his indictment on involuntary manslaughter charges in the "Rust" film shooting case should be thrown out because forensic tests damaged the actor's gun, a key piece of evidence in the case.

  • June 28, 2024

    Texas Justices Scrap $26M Verdict In Honda Seat Belt Suit

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday handed American Honda Motor Co. Inc. a post-trial win, vacating a $26 million verdict for a woman who was paralyzed after a crash in 2015, saying the evidence she presented was not enough to rebut a presumption of nonliability under Texas law.

  • June 28, 2024

    Philly Judge Calls $2.25B Roundup Verdict 'Excessive'

    A Philadelphia state judge has explained her decision to slash a cancer patient's $2.25 billion win against Monsanto for its Roundup weedkiller contributing to his lymphoma, calling the jury's January verdict unconstitutionally "excessive."

Expert Analysis

  • Circumstantial Evidence Requires A Pointillist Approach

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    Because complex cases with sophisticated defendants are unlikely to reveal much, if any, direct evidence, attorneys must aggregate many pieces of circumstantial evidence into a cohesive narrative — much like the painting technique of pointillism, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Benzene Contamination Concerns: Drugmakers' Next Steps

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    After a citizen petition to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and a flurry of class actions over benzene contamination in benzoyl peroxide acne products, affected manufacturers should consider a thoughtful approach that includes assembling internal data and possibly contacting the FDA for product-specific discussions, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Policy Misrepresentations Carry Insurance Rescission Risks

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    The Second Circuit's recent decision in Medical Mutual v. Gnik, finding that material misrepresentation in a clinic's insurance applications warranted policy rescission, is a clear example of the far-reaching effects that misrepresentations can have and provides a reminder that policyholders should employ relatively straightforward steps to decrease risks, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Opinion

    Federal MDL Rule Benefits From Public Comments

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    The new Federal Rule of Civil Procedure concerning multidistrict litigation that was approved this week by the Advisory Committee on Civil Rules incorporates ideas from public comments that will aid both plaintiffs and defense attorneys — and if ultimately adopted, the rule should promote efficient, merits-driven MDL case management, say Robert Johnston and Gary Feldon at Hollingsworth.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Opinion

    New Mexico Fire Victims Deserve Justice From Federal Gov't

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    Two years after the largest fire in New Mexico's history — a disaster caused by the U.S. government's mismanagement of prescribed burns — the Federal Emergency Management Agency must remedy its grossly inadequate relief efforts and flawed legal interpretations that have left victims of the fire still waiting for justice, says former New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • How Purdue Pharma High Court Case May Change Bankruptcy

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s upcoming ruling in Purdue Pharma may be the death of most third-party releases in Chapter 11 cases, and depending on the decision’s breadth, could have much more far-reaching effects on the entire bankruptcy system, say Brian Shaw and David Doyle at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Calif. High Court Ruling Has Lessons For Waiving Jury Trials

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    The California Supreme Court’s recent decision in TriCoast Builders v. Fonnegra, denying relief to a contractor that had waived its right to a jury trial, shows that litigants should always post jury fees as soon as possible, and seek writ review if the court denies relief from a waiver, say Steven Fleischman and Nicolas Sonnenburg at Horvitz & Levy.

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