Trials

  • June 28, 2024

    In Chevron Case, Justices Trade One Unknown For Another

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overrule a decades-old judicial deference doctrine may cause the "eternal fog of uncertainty" surrounding federal agency actions to dissipate and level the playing field in challenges of government policies, but lawyers warn it raises new questions over what rules courts must follow and how judges will implement them.

  • June 28, 2024

    Calif. Panel Won't Toss Trial Win By AT&T's Cricket

    Cricket Communications Inc. won't have to worry about a 2018 jury trial win being kiboshed after a California appeals court ruled that when it overturned a pretrial ruling because a previous judge failed to disclose that he owned AT&T stock, it didn't mean the entire trial should be undone.

  • June 28, 2024

    The NFL Lost Big: What Happened, What Happens Next

    A California federal jury's rebuke of the NFL's Sunday Ticket broadcast package has the league staring down a $4.7 billion class action verdict, prompting experts to wonder why the league was willing to risk a jury trial in the first place and how it will try to overturn the verdict now that it lost.

  • June 28, 2024

    Fired BlueCross Worker Gets $680K Jury Win In Vax Bias Suit

    A Tennessee federal jury awarded a former BlueCross BlueShield employee more than $680,000 after it found the insurance company failed to accommodate her when she was fired for refusing its COVID-19 vaccination mandate because of her religious convictions.

  • June 28, 2024

    Jury Convicts Seattle Doctor In NBA Health Fraud Case

    A Manhattan federal jury on Friday found a Seattle doctor guilty of healthcare fraud and other charges related to a scheme to submit bogus claims for payment to an NBA healthcare plan, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York.

  • June 28, 2024

    Girardi's Ch. 7 Evidence Fight May Raise Novel Issues

    Tom Girardi told a California federal judge that FBI agents violated his constitutional rights by obtaining evidence from his law firm's bankruptcy trustee without a search warrant, an argument that, if successful, could hamstring prosecutors in his upcoming wire fraud trial and shake up law enforcement's dealings with trustees.

  • June 28, 2024

    Baldwin Loses Third Bid To Dismiss 'Rust' Shooting Case

    A New Mexico state judge on Friday rejected Alec Baldwin's argument that his indictment on involuntary manslaughter charges in the "Rust" film shooting case should be thrown out because forensic tests damaged the actor's gun, a key piece of evidence in the case.

  • June 28, 2024

    Jan. 6 Ruling May Help Accused Rioters, But Not Trump

    Experts said Friday that while the U.S. Supreme Court's decision narrowing the use of obstruction of Congress charges could have implications for hundreds of people accused of storming the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, the same count against former president Donald Trump remains buoyed by facts alleged in his election interference indictment.

  • June 28, 2024

    Texas Justices Scrap $26M Verdict In Honda Seat Belt Suit

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday handed American Honda Motor Co. Inc. a post-trial win, vacating a $26 million verdict for a woman who was paralyzed after a crash in 2015, saying the evidence she presented was not enough to rebut a presumption of nonliability under Texas law.

  • June 28, 2024

    Philly Judge Calls $2.25B Roundup Verdict 'Excessive'

    A Philadelphia state judge has explained her decision to slash a cancer patient's $2.25 billion win against Monsanto for its Roundup weedkiller contributing to his lymphoma, calling the jury's January verdict unconstitutionally "excessive."

  • June 28, 2024

    Verizon Hit With $847M Patent Verdict In EDTX

    An Eastern District of Texas federal jury on Friday said Verizon should pay $847 million for infringing two General Access Solutions wireless network patents, providing the patent owner with the full relief it requested.

  • June 28, 2024

    Bannon Can't Dodge Prison In Contempt Appeal

    Steve Bannon must go to prison Monday, according to a U.S. Supreme Court order Friday rejecting the former Trump White House chief strategist's bid to stave off his four-month sentence for contempt of Congress.

  • June 28, 2024

    Bank Shareholders Win $800K In Venezuelan Takeover Suit

    Shareholders in a small Miami bank won an $800,000 award Thursday after a federal jury found two of the five board members accused of working for the Venezuelan government liable for the bank's financial difficulties.

  • June 28, 2024

    High Court Enters July With 3 Rulings To Go

    In a rare move, the U.S. Supreme Court will issue opinions into the beginning of July as the court tries to clear its merits docket of three remaining cases dealing with presidential immunity, whether governments can control social media platforms' content moderation policies and the appropriate deadline to challenge agency action. 

  • June 28, 2024

    Justices Limit Fed. Use Of Obstruction Charge In Jan. 6 Cases

    The U.S. Supreme Court limited Friday the U.S. Department of Justice's use of an obstruction of Congress statute against defendants accused of storming the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, ruling the law enacted in the wake of an accounting scandal requires the obstructive act must somehow impair the availability or integrity of official documents or proceedings.

  • June 27, 2024

    Ozy Media's Gov't Misconduct Claims Won't Derail Fraud Case

    A New York federal judge on Thursday rejected a bid by Ozy Media and the defunct company's founder to toss the criminal fraud case against them, saying they hadn't shown they were prejudiced by a U.S. attorney's office's social media post or that documents obtained by prosecutors were protected by attorney-client privilege.

  • June 27, 2024

    Roche Freedman, Ousted Ex-Partner Settle Ahead Of July Trial

    The law firm formerly known as Roche Freedman LLP and ousted partner Jason Cyrulnik informed a New York federal judge Thursday they've cut a confidential deal to resolve their contentious legal battle over Cyrulnik's departure, ending the litigation weeks before the case was set to go to a jury trial.

  • June 27, 2024

    Biden Takes Dig At 'Convicted Felon' Trump In 1st Debate

    President Joe Biden referred to former President Donald Trump as a "convicted felon" during Thursday's presidential debate, while Trump suggested that Biden could be criminally prosecuted after leaving office.

  • June 27, 2024

    Menendez Met Alleged Briber Pre-Gold Price Search, Jury Told

    An FBI cell tower expert told Sen. Robert Menendez's bribery jury Thursday that the phones of the senator, his wife and co-defendant developer Fred Daibes all pinged in the same location minutes before the senator did a web search for "how much is one kilo of gold worth."

  • June 27, 2024

    Judge Blasts Prisons Bureau, Sends Exec To Halfway House

    An Illinois federal judge said Thursday he felt he needed to protect Outcome Health's co-founder from the Bureau of Prisons' "ridiculous" policy barring her from a low security camp just because she isn't a citizen, sentencing her to time served and three years' supervision in a Chicago halfway house instead. 

  • June 27, 2024

    Ga. Judge Says NBC Falsely Reported Mass Hysterectomies

    A Georgia federal judge has ruled several news programs under the NBCUniversal umbrella incorrectly portrayed a doctor as having performed unwanted mass hysterectomies on immigrant women held at a private detention center.

  • June 27, 2024

    Google Rips Rumble's 'Fishing Expedition' For DOJ Trial Docs

    Google urged a California magistrate judge Thursday to reject video-sharing site Rumble's demands for depositions and trial exhibits from the U.S. Justice Department's antitrust bench trial against Google in Washington, D.C., arguing that the requests are irrelevant to Rumble's antitrust claims and an unfounded "post-hoc fishing expedition."

  • June 27, 2024

    AG Says Trump Recusal Bid Relies On 'Distortion Of Facts'

    New York's attorney general says Donald Trump is relying on a "distortion of facts" in seeking to oust the judge who ordered the former president to pay $465 million in penalties in his civil fraud case.

  • June 27, 2024

    No Sentencing Delay For Ex-Union Head Ahead Of Retrial Date

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has rejected former International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98 business manager John Dougherty's request to postpone his sentencing for his bribery and embezzlement convictions ahead of the government possibly retrying him on extortion charges following an April mistrial.

  • June 27, 2024

    NFL Hit With $4.7B Verdict In Sunday Ticket Antitrust Trial

    A California federal jury handed the National Football League and its teams a stunning courtroom defeat Thursday by awarding two classes of DirecTV Sunday Ticket subscribers about $4.7 billion in total damages in an antitrust trial over claims they illegally pumped up the price of the sports broadcast package.

Expert Analysis

  • Infringement Policy Lessons From 4th Circ. Sony Music Ruling

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    The Fourth Circuit's recent decision in Sony Music v. Cox Communications, which in part held that the internet service provider was liable for contributing to music copyright infringement, highlights the importance of reasonable policies to terminate repeat infringers, and provides guidance for litigating claims of secondary liability, say Benjamin Marks and Alexandra Blankman at Weil.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • When Your Client Insists On Testifying In A Criminal Case

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    Speculation that former President Donald Trump could take the stand in any of the four criminal cases he faces serves as a reminder for counsel to consider their ethical obligations when a client insists on testifying, including the attorney’s duty of candor to the court and the depth of their discussions with clients, says Marissa Kingman at Fox Rothschild.

  • 5 Things Trial Attorneys Can Learn From Good Teachers

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    Jennifer Cuculich at IMS Legal Strategies recounts lessons she learned during her time as a math teacher that can help trial attorneys connect with jurors, from the importance of framing core issues to the incorporation of different learning styles.

  • Why Preemption Args Wouldn't Stall Trump Hush-Money Case

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    With former President Donald Trump's New York hush-money criminal trial weeks away, some speculate that he may soon move to stay the case on preemption grounds, but under the Anti-Injunction Act and well-settled case law, that motion would likely be quickly denied, says former New York Supreme Court Justice Ethan Greenberg, now at Anderson Kill.

  • Insurance Implications Of Trump's NY Civil Fraud Verdict

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    A New York state trial court’s $450 million judgment against former President Donald Trump and affiliated entities for valuation fraud offers several important lessons for companies seeking to obtain directors and officers insurance, including the consequences of fraudulent misrepresentations and critical areas of underwriting risk, says Kevin LaCroix at RT ProExec.

  • Employers Should Take Surgeon's Sex Bias Suit As A Warning

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    A Philadelphia federal jury's recent verdict in a sex bias suit over Thomas Jefferson University's inaction on a male plaintiff's sexual harassment complaint is a reminder to employers of all stripes about the importance of consistently applied protocols for handling complaints, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • Making The Pitch For A Civil Resolution In A Criminal Case

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    Even without the depth of visibility into prosecutorial decision making offered by special counsel Robert Hur’s recently released report, defense counsel may be able to make the case for civil resolutions of criminal investigations while minimizing a potential negative response from prosecutors to such an argument, says Bill Athanas at Bradley Arant.

  • Litigation Inspiration: A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

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    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • Generative AI Adds Risk To Employee 'Self-Help' Discovery

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    Plaintiffs have long engaged in their own evidence gathering for claims against current or former employers, but as more companies implement generative AI tools, both the potential scope and the potential risks of such "self-help" discovery are rising quickly, says Nick Peterson at Wiley.

  • 5 Ways To Hone Deposition Skills And Improve Results

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Depositions must never be taken for granted in the preparations needed to win a dispositive motion or a trial, and five best practices, including knowing when to hire a videographer, can significantly improve outcomes, says James Argionis at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Series

    Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

  • Navigating Trade Secret Litigation In A High-Stakes Landscape

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    Recent eye-popping verdicts are becoming increasingly common in trade secret litigation — but employers can take several proactive steps to protect proprietary information and defend against misappropriation accusations in order to avoid becoming the next headline, say Jessica Mason and Jack FitzGerald at Foley & Lardner.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Forget Everything You Know About IRAC

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    The mode of legal reasoning most students learn in law school, often called “Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion,” or IRAC, erroneously frames analysis as a separate, discrete step, resulting in disorganized briefs and untold obfuscation — but the fix is pretty simple, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Zero-Point Offender Eligibility May Hinge On Meaning Of 'And'

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    Some white collar defendants’ eligibility for the new zero-point offender sentencing adjustment comes down to whether the word “and” really means “and” — a question the U.S. Supreme Court is set to resolve in its upcoming Pulsifer v. U.S. decision, which could affect thousands of incarcerated people, say Brandon McCarthy and Nikita Yogeshwarun at Katten.

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